Turkey blocks Wikipedia over an alleged 'smear campaign'
Apr29

Turkey blocks Wikipedia over an alleged 'smear campaign'

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Turkey may have just stepped up its efforts to quash online free speech. The country has blocked Wikipedia for supposedly running a “smear campaign” by allowing articles claiming that the Turkish government was coordinating with militant groups. The government says it will lift the restrictions if Wikipedia complies, but that isn’t likely to happen unless there’s proof the collaboration claims aren’t true. Jimmy Wales and the Wikimedia Foundation are determined to protect truth in reporting, and that means posting articles that be less than flattering to politicians. Accordingly, the Wikimedia Foundation tells us that it’s “committed” to keeping Wikipedia available in Turkey. It’s pushing for a “judicial review” of the decision. You can read the full statement below. The ban may not hold forever, even if the Wikipedia team refuses to budge. The ban has to go to a court within 24 hours of taking effect, and that court has two days to decide on whether or not the ban sticks. There have been successful challenges to bans in the past. However, it’s hard not to see this as part of a chilling trend of online censorship in Turkey — particularly in the aftermath of a referendum that, if upheld, grants President Erdogan sweeping powers. The country’s leadership is determined to hold on at all costs, and that means suppressing any internet content (true or not) that might question its legitimacy. “The Wikimedia Foundation has learned that access to Wikipedia has been blocked in Turkey as of Saturday, April 29th. Wikipedia is a rich and valuable source of neutral, reliable information in hundreds of languages, written by volunteers around the world. We are committed to ensuring that Wikipedia remains available to the millions of people who rely on it in Turkey. To that end, we are actively working with outside counsel to seek judicial review of the decision affecting access to Wikipedia. We hope the issue can be resolved promptly.” Source: Turkey Blocks, Reuters Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Watch SpaceX try a picture-perfect rocket landing at 7AM ET
Apr29

Watch SpaceX try a picture-perfect rocket landing at 7AM ET

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Many SpaceX rocket landings have gotchas for viewers. Drone ship landings frequently mean shaky satellite video feeds, and nighttime launches just aren’t very photogenic. You’re about to have a much better look, however. SpaceX is launching a US spy satellite (NROL-76) on April 30th in circumstances that are about as good as you could hope for. The 7AM Eastern launch window opening is definitely early (especially if you’re on the West coast), but it guarantees daylight at Cape Canaveral. And more importantly, there will be a ground landing — you should get unfettered, high-quality video of the whole affair. As Reddit user 007T points out, there’s only been one other landing with this set of circumstances before: the CRS-10 mission from mid-February. We’d expect this sort of picture-perfect rocket landing to become relatively commonplace now that SpaceX has stepped up its launch schedule, but you may want to cherish the novelty while it lasts. If you’re up shortly after sunrise, you can tune in below. Via: Reddit Source: SpaceX, YouTube Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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EPA pulls climate science web pages to reflect White House views
Apr29

EPA pulls climate science web pages to reflect White House views

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. President Trump and Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt aren’t exactly fans of climate science, and they’re scaling back the EPA’s website to reflect their views. The EPA has started implementing a site revision that will “reflect the approach of new leadership.” As you might surmise, that means that mentions of climate change, regulation and Obama-era policies are on the chopping block — the language endorsing the Clean Power Plan is “out of date,” the EPA claims. And unfortunately, that means axing information that has been around for multiple administrations. The Washington Post notes that the EPA has pulled a nearly 20-year-old page explaining the fundamentals of climate change and how it affects the US. While updates to the site were frozen and closely scrutinized under President George W. Bush’s administration, his White House was still content to leave the page running — clearly, even that was too much under the new presidency. The EPA stresses that it will use “proper archiving procedures” to preserve the previous version of its website. That information won’t disappear if you’re really looking for it. However, the very fact that it’s going away from the current site is problematic. While the EPA website is bound to reflect administration policies, the basic climate science content was a valuable source of information for students and anyone else who needs to know how climate change works. Curious minds will have to turn to the archives or third-party sources to get the facts. And of course, it’s hard to escape the irony of an environmental agency that avoids mentioning science that helps the environment. Via: Reuters Source: EPA, Washington Post Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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'The Circle' takes anti-tech paranoia to ludicrous heights
Apr29

'The Circle' takes anti-tech paranoia to ludicrous heights

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. As a book, David Eggers’ The Circle was a flimsy attack against modern technology culture with occasional bits of insight. As a film, though, it’s so disjointed, ridiculous and dull that even Tom Hanks can’t save it. Sure, it didn’t really have much of a chance, given its source material. But as a fan of director James Ponsoldt’s (The Spectacular Now, The End of the Tour) work, I had an inkling of hope that The Circle would translate better to the big screen. Unfortunately, practically nothing about the film works. And that’s a shame — more than ever, there’s a desperate need for intelligent criticism of the technology industry today. Spoilers for The Circle novel and film ahead. Black Mirror does a fine job of portraying the downsides of technology. but even though it’s now readily available on Netflix, it’s still something that’s targeted at a media and tech-savvy niche audience. A big-budget, wide-release film starring Tom Hanks and Emma Watson has more potential to reach a broader group of people who might not think as deeply about the privacy issues surrounding their Facebook accounts. Sadly, all the film really does is shout, as loudly as possible, that technology is bad and will inevitably lead us towards a totalitarian state. The basic premise of the film feels like a modern day Charlie in the Chocolate Factory. Mae (Emma Watson) is a twenty-something with a dead-end job who miraculously receives a job with The Circle, a beloved company whose religion is sharing and who now controls the vast majority of the web. You can think of it as the lovechild of Google and Facebook. Its earliest innovation was “TruYou,” a unified account that controls everything you do on the web and ties you to your real identity. TruYou was heralded as a major convenience win for consumers, which was somehow steamrolled pass regulators and critics. Even more unbelievable, the film claims that it sanitized the web by killing off anonymous comments. Seriously, all it takes is a quick look at any site with Facebook-powered commenting to see that’s false. The company’s follow-up product — tiny and inexpensive high-definition cameras that can be placed just about anywhere — is a bit more believable. But that’s only until you learn that they also upload video directly to satellites from anywhere on Earth (for free, I guess?). And no, there’s no talk of battery life either. As Eamon Bailey (Tom Hanks), The Circle’s affable figurehead, describes it, the “SeaChange” cameras will lead to a world where nothing is hidden. It’s easy to...

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Recommended Reading: The genetics of better beer
Apr29

Recommended Reading: The genetics of better beer

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. You Want Better Beer? Good. Here’s a Better Barley Genome Adam Rogers, Wired The beer industry certainly isn’t hurting for money these days, but a group of scientists are trying to figure out how to make the beverage even better. They’re doing so by breaking down the genome of barley, a key ingredient in the brewing process that that turns starch into sugar for yeast to transform into alcohol during fermentation. Wired has the story of how the geneticists could be on the way to improving suds for all of us to enjoy. What Makes Oddworld Tick Richard Moss, Polygon Lorne Lanning, creative director of Oddworld Inhabitants, offers a look into the Oddworld universe as he works on his latest title Soulstorm. ‘Austin Powers’ at 20: Mike Myers, Jay Roach, More Spill Secrets in Shagadelic Oral History Ryan Parker, The Hollywood Reporter Groovy, baby. Yeeeeeeah! Bill Nye Saves the World from Disabled People Crippled Scholar Bill Nye’s new Netflix series is here and the manner in which the show tackles the subject of so-called designer babies is rather troubling. How to Detect Fake News in Real-Time Krishna Bharat, NewCo Shift Need to sharpen your fake news hunting skills? Here are some tips from a founder of Google News. Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Elon Musk gives us a glimpse of Tesla's electric semi truck
Apr29

Elon Musk gives us a glimpse of Tesla's electric semi truck

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Elon Musk made a few revelations about some his newer projects this week, including the electric semi-truck Tesla has been working on since 2016. The automaker promised to unveil the big rig this September, but the Tesla-slash-SpaceX chief has given us a shadowy first look during his TED talk on April 28th. Based on what little we can see in the image above, it looks smoother than your average truck, with headlights and general design that seem to take cues from the company’s cars. Musk described the vehicle as a “spry truck” that you can drive around like a sports car — he said he’d already taken it for a spin himself. You can judge for yourself when Tesla reveals it in its full glory this fall. Other than Tesla’s big rig, Musk also showed off what The Boring Company’s digging machine looks like earlier this week. His new company released a concept video showing how an underground tunnel network can help commuters get to their destinations much faster than before. Elon Musk teased semi-truck at TED talk. pic.twitter.com/sY0w7KSsTx — Johana Bhuiyan (@JMBooyah) April 28, 2017 Source: AutoBlog, TechCrunch Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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The Morning After: Weekend Edition
Apr29

The Morning After: Weekend Edition

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Hey, good morning! You look fabulous. Life imitating art imitating…life? Netflix’s series about prison is involved in an actual crime, and Elon Musk is going back into the tunnels. We’ll explain. Or, it’s a very meta ad campaignHackers release most of ‘Orange is the New Black’ season five Someone calling themselves TheDarkOverlord tried to secure a ransom from Netflix on Friday. Having obtained a copy of the upcoming OITNB season from a third party audio production company, they first released the premiere episode and eventually, the first ten of 13 episodes. The story is not over, however, as the person or persons claim they have more Netflix, Fox, ABC, IFC and National Geographic content stored away ready to release unless they’re paid. Even if ‘XLED’ is mostly hypeVizio’s new M-series 4K TVs are its real 2017 highlight We took a look at Vizio’s new 2017 displays and surprise, it looks like yet another year of high picture quality combined with affordable prices. The XLED branding shouldn’t be confused with Samsung’s QLED technology or LG’s OLED, but the use of local dimming in Vizio’s sets is easy to understand. Last year’s tablet remote is gone, replaced with a new setup where the TVs act as both Chromecast source and receiver. Of course, after last year’s FTC fine we’d probably double check the privacy policy before bringing one of these home. This is happeningMeet Larry Page’s ‘flying car’ The Kitty Hawk Flyer isn’t the flying car we asked for, but it’s the one that will go on sale by the end of this year. The propeller-driven one-seater isn’t cleared for use over populated land, but it might be just right for your second lake house. Any trips of greater significance will have to wait for a flying machine from Google’s other co-founder. Stop us if you’ve heard this beforeXbox chief envisions a Netflix model for narrative games In an interview with The Guardian, Xbox boss Phil Spencer made his pitch for games distributed by subscription service. Moving beyond what we’ve already heard about the upcoming Xbox Game Pass plan, he said “[Subscription services] might spur new story-based games coming to market because there’s a new business model to help support their monetization.” It’s an interesting idea, but so far has very little to back it up — we may hear more at E3 in June. It just knows.Google’s next trick for Android is ‘copyless pasting’ A look at the code for Android O has revealed a new feature on the way soon. Called “Copyless Paste,” your device will be able...

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Hackers stole a copy of 'Orange is the New Black' season five
Apr29

Hackers stole a copy of 'Orange is the New Black' season five

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. The next season of Orange is the New Black isn’t supposed to premiere until June 9th, but the first episode has already leaked. That’s because a hacker or group of hackers going by the name ‘TheDarkOverlord stole the content from a third party, and they’re demanding Netflix pay a ransom in order to keep the rest of the season private. Late Friday night, TheDarkOverlord tweeted about content belonging to ABC, FOX, IFC and National Geographic, saying “We’re not playing any games anymore.” According to TorrentFreak, the source of the breach was Larson Studios, an audio production company in Hollywood that does ADR (Automatic Dialog Replacement) work. The hackers claim Larson agreed to pay up but didn’t, and now they’re trying to squeeze Netflix. In a statement, Netflix has said “We are aware of the situation. A production vendor used by several major TV studios had its security compromised and the appropriate law enforcement authorities are involved.” Who is next on the list? FOX, IFC, NAT GEO, and ABC. Oh, what fun we’re all going to have. We’re not playing any games anymore. — thedarkoverlord (@tdohack3r) April 29, 2017 Source: TorrentFreak, AP, Pastebin Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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There's a slackbot for people who like to shit where they eat
Apr28

There's a slackbot for people who like to shit where they eat

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Online dating and work chat apps have been separate entities for entirely logical, productive and HR-compliant reasons. But a dating app-maker has decided that the line dividing office life and love life should be blurred with the help of a chatbot for the reigning king of productivity services, Slack. If you think company-sanctioned flirting through work messaging is a good idea, you should probably talk to your human resources department. Because this is playing with fire in a way that gets people fired. The slackbot for inter-office dating was built by Feeld, which is mostly known as “the threesome app.” (Yup.) To some extent, it’s likely a stunt (date your coworkers using app plugins!), and most workplaces will see its danger coming a mile away. Like all bots on Slack, only administrators can install it into your company’s channels — which means your bosses would have to knowingly green light this bad idea. Once active, you just mention your crush’s name to the slackbot, and if they do the same, it will throw you two in a private chatroom like a digital Cupid. You can also mute the bot if you don’t want to tempt fate and/or office stability. Or if you’re in a relationship already. Or if you just don’t want the attention because you’re at work. That’s the biggest flaw in this lopsided idea: That disrupting the sometimes-tenuous neutrality of a workspace is a good thing. Doing your job is hard enough and sexual harassment is still a wretched reality for many employees, male and female, across all industries. HR clamps down on romantic entanglement between coworkers because it can, and does, poison work environments. The damage impacts productivity and can bleed into the personal lives of all involved — including other coworkers sucked in the Charybdal void of hurt feelings and bad breakups. Or, at worst, ruined marriages and careers due to illicit affairs. There’s well-intentioned naivete in Feeld founder Dimo Trifonov’s explanation of the slackbot on PRX. The bot could liberate us from the traditional workplace’s anemic rules, he said: “What’s behind this bot, at the end of the day? In short, the idea that you can still have feelings for other people in the workplace, and embrace them. I’m not speaking about anything sexual, necessarily. But right now we’re stuck in an old paradigm: workplace policies should evolve to reflect human nature more fully, rather than suppress parts of it as they do now.” Companies should flex and adapt to the times, but shouldn’t willingly endanger productivity-focused environments. Boring? Yes. But you don’t...

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Yik Yak's anonymous chat app is shutting down
Apr28

Yik Yak's anonymous chat app is shutting down

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Just four years after it started, Yik Yak is shutting down. In the past couple of years, issues like bullying have taken a toll on the allure of the anonymous internet, while this app had its own issues with threats and harassment. In a blog post, the Yik Yak team didn’t explain their reasons for shutting down, but did confirm earlier reports that a “few members” will join Square. In 2015 we recounted the rise and fall of Secret, however others like Whisper and Confide are still going. Business Insider reports that it raised more than $73 million in venture capital, but struggled to keep its users as students migrated to other apps like Snapchat. Via: Business Insider Source: Yik Yak Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Elon Musk wants to build a traffic-skipping tunnel utopia
Apr28

Elon Musk wants to build a traffic-skipping tunnel utopia

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Back in December, SpaceX and Tesla founder Elon Musk sent a frustrated tweet vowing to alleviate traffic by grabbing a tunnel-boring machine and going to work. While this seemed like the usual What If thought Musk dispatches to the Twitterverse, it seems he’s actually going into the tunnel business with his adorably-named new venture, The Boring Company. Today, the futurist released a concept video for what an underground tunnel network might look like in today’s car-focused cities. When a vehicle drives on to a street-level sled platform, it lowers down to a subterranean network of tunnels and automatically slides the locked-in car to a high-speed track before spitting it back out to rise to its chosen destination. Pedestrians and bikers can walk into an enclosed pod and similarly rocket around below the surface. There aren’t any details or accompanying statements, but it’s certainly a novel concept given that most transportation concepts focus on efficient mass transit, not bypassing traffic-jammed freeways. Earlier this week, a SpaceX employee posted a photo of The Boring Company’s first digging machine. The pic was removed, but Business Insider saved a screenshot for posterity: Doubling down on his tweet didn’t come out of nowhere, though. Musk began digging an experimental “demo tunnel” in the SpaceX parking lot back in February. He doesn’t need permits to dig on private company property, but he would need to get them from the city of Los Angeles should he want to dig beyond SpaceX’s campus. Source: YouTube Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Fitbit says that Flex 2 didn't explode on its own
Apr28

Fitbit says that Flex 2 didn't explode on its own

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Wisconsin resident Dina Mitchell said she suffered second-degree burns on her arm after her Fitbit Flex 2 suddenly caught fire on Tuesday, while she was reading a book. Today, Fitbit says that didn’t happen. “Based on our initial investigation, including testing of her device by a leading third-party failure analysis firm, we have concluded that Ms. Mitchell’s Fitbit Flex 2 did not malfunction,” a Fitbit spokesperson says. “The testing shows that external forces caused the damage to the device.” Fitbit’s conclusion suggests the Flex 2’s lithium-ion battery didn’t overheat after all. These batteries are often the culprit behind exploding devices like the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 or the Basis Peak wearable (both of which were recalled). For now, Fitbit says it hasn’t received any other complaints of exploding Flex 2s and the company encourages owners to continue wearing the fitness trackers without fear. Yep, even while reading a book. “The health and safety of our customers is our top priority and, as such, Fitbit products are designed and produced in accordance with strict standards and undergo extensive internal and external testing to ensure the safety of our users,” the spokesperson says. Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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We destroyed a collectible Doritos bag to get at its hidden MP3 Player
Apr28

We destroyed a collectible Doritos bag to get at its hidden MP3 Player

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Junk food and summer blockbusters go hand in hand — from the nachos, popcorn and candy you buy at the cinema, to action-hero faces plastered on every brand of potato chips at the supermarket. This has been the way of the world as long as I can remember, but this summer, the pairing may have reached its apex. In a perfect storm of brand synergy, nostalgia and guilty pleasures, Marvel has decided to release the soundtrack to ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ in the most unconventional format imaginable: a bag of Nacho Cheese Doritos. Like Frito-Lay’s last “smart bag,” the album-in-a-Doritos-bag gimmick is a bizarre, yet weirdly delightful marketing mess. The film’s soundtrack isn’t hidden in the bag as a CD or thumb drive, nor is it a redemption code for iTunes or Google Play — the album is literally built into the Doritos bag as a faux-cassette player, complete with a headphone jack, buttons to play, rewind, fast-forward, change volume or stop and a mini-USB port to recharge. Again — this is a bag of tortilla chips that you can recharge. The moment new of this absurd product tie-in reached Engadget, our team had questions. Does it sound any good? Can you transfer the music to your phone? If you tear the bag apart, are you rewarded with a halfway decent media player? We resolved to track down a bag, destroy it, and find out. You can tell at a glance that the ‘Guardians of the Galaxy’ Doritos aren’t your typical bag of snack chips. For one, the bag itself comes in a display box decorated to look like a vintage stereo, with printed dials and a window peeking through to the bag’s embedded media player. Inside the box are instructions (plug in headphones and turn it on, of course) and an extremely cheap headset reminiscent of 1990s “walkman style” stereo cans with a thin metal headband and flimsy, foam-covered speakers. While the headphones do look a lot like the pair Chris Pratt wore in the original Guardians movie, they put out decidedly low fidelity sound. Maybe it’s an intentional nod to the MP3 player’s facade: cassette tapes never sounded that great anyway. Either way, the bag’s music player doesn’t need cheap headphones to be mediocre. The ports on ours were so misaligned that we actually couldn’t get the headphones to plug in until we opened the bag and shuffled around the internals. When we finally got the audio port lined up, it worked well enough to fulfill its novelty — but the music was a...

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NASA pushes first launch of its Mars rocket to 2019
Apr28

NASA pushes first launch of its Mars rocket to 2019

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. The Space Launch System (SLS), the heavy rocket NASA plans to send humans to Mars with, won’t get its first launch until 2019. Tech problems have delayed the project years later than Congress’ originally estimated it would debut, but space agency officials have confirmed that the big lifter’s initial flight will be pushed back again from late 2018 to sometime in 2019. A NASA official confirmed the delay in a letter appended to a Government Accountability Office report noted that the rocket most likely wouldn’t make its November 2018 first launch deadline. That flight will test the SLS and Orion capsule attached to it, which the agency plans to use to house humans on missions to the Moon and Mars. Last September, independent analysis deemed the Orion program behind schedule and in danger of going over budget, which is one factor in pushing back the combined launch. The program requires 12 months of work to integrate the Orion in with the crew capsule before delivering it for launch, according to SpaceNews. While planning for an unmanned debut launch was already strenuous, NASA announced in February that it would consider adding humans to the initial test flight. Officials admitted that adding humans to the equation would likely delay the launch anyway, but it’s unclear if this was a prime factor in the latest decision to suspend the first flight until 2019. If it’s pushed back any farther, it might run behind SpaceX’s planned launch mission, which was itself recently delayed until 2020. Via: Ars Technica Source: Government Accountability Office report (PDF) Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Apple Music clips are the new stars of Musical.ly videos
Apr28

Apple Music clips are the new stars of Musical.ly videos

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Part creation tool, part social network, the popular Musical.ly app lets users make and share their own music videos using segments of songs. Thanks to a new deal with Apple, the service’s users will be able to add songs from the vast Apple Music library to their latest masterpieces. Released in 2014, Musical.ly built a massive following that seemed to hit its highest mark last year. The app lets you create 15-second music videos with different video and visual effects, then share to other Musical.ly members. Used by US teens and celebrities alike, the service seems like a perfect fit for Apple, who are currently looking to raise the visibility of video in their Apple Music ecosystem. The Shanghai-based app developer also launched Livel.ly, a livestreaming app that hasn’t quite caught on with teens like the original app did. Musical.ly is available on the iTunes and Amazon app stores and Google Play. 🚨🚨 Did you know?? We’ve teamed up with @musicallyapp to bring you full versions of your favorite songs without having to leave the app! pic.twitter.com/3eC21V6cme — Apple Music (@AppleMusic) April 28, 2017 Via: Recode Source: Apple Music (Twitter) Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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The war for the soul of the password
Apr28

The war for the soul of the password

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Obviously, whoever invented the password system was a jerk. And whoever started adding all those little rules for password creation is a sadist. Not the kind of sex-positive sadist with a flag for their kink and a set of consensual negotiation rules that ensure password creation is hot for everyone involved. No, we’re talking about the kind of sadist that simply likes watching people suffer as they’re told to add special characters, but not dollar signs or exclamation points because… reasons. But our passwords are more than that. They’re how we prove that we’re really us. They are the cornerstone of our digital identities. And everyone wants a piece of them. There’s a race on right now to control or reinvent our log-in processes. Companies are offering convenience and security in exchange for handing over critical pieces of our identities. You might call it a fight for the soul of our passwords. MasterCard and Samsung have attempted “selfie security,” which was easily spoofed with photos. There’s big money being poured into biometric security research, where your device “reads” hundreds of different things about you, like gestures, sounds, and more. We’ll probably find out how it fails when we try to log in while drunk in our Halloween costumes. Another entry in the verification race are fingerprint readers. Things like Apple’s Touch ID, are fast and convenient — great for kids that want to place orders with a parent’s thumb when they’re sleeping, or for police that want to unlock your phone without your consent (fingerprints aren’t protected like passwords are under federal law). Then there’s the password manager bonanza. These apps manage all your annoying log-ins. But, the market is becoming so saturated that you need to be careful choosing one so you don’t end up with a pile of insecure snake oil. That being said you should really, really get yourself a password manager. In a world so insane we need dozens of different passwords just to pay our bills, get and keep a job, and manage our health care, this particular security invention is a life saver. Most security professionals agree: Everyone should be using one. Which is why the password manager market is getting crowded. Of course, you can just let companies log in for you. When you choose to “log in with LinkedIn” (or Facebook, Twitter, or Google), that third-party gets permission to use your account information. It’s convenient, you don’t have to remember a password or expose it while you type. Sometimes, though, the third parties get extended permissions, like being able to...

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Merriam-Webster's idea of 'sheeple' are Apple fanboys
Apr28

Merriam-Webster's idea of 'sheeple' are Apple fanboys

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. I’ll admit it: I’m an unabashed Apple fanboy. I spent far too much on a Macbook Pro with specs that would cost half as much in the Windows world, I love my pair of ridiculous-looking and easily misplaced AirPods and I may or may not have a box full of old Newtons and Mac 512K parts. There’s a term for folks like me, and Merriam-Webster just made it official: “Sheeple.” The dictionary’s editors just added the term, calling out its sick burn to Apple fans in a tweet. Wake up! ‘Sheeple’ is in the dictionary now. https://t.co/pbXVADEoBm — Merriam-Webster (@MerriamWebster) April 27, 2017 The new entry says that sheeple are those “people who are docile, compliant, or easily influenced: People likened to sheep.” Which sounds fine until you read the final contextual sentence. “Apple’s debuted a battery case for the juice-sucking iPhone — an ungainly lumpy case the sheeple will happily shell out $99 for.” This lovely quote comes from CNN’s Doug Criss back in 2015 as part of his “5 Things” column. Thanks, Doug. The word sheeple itself, though, has been in use since 1945, according to the dictionary page. Merriam-Webster’s Twitter account has become a surprise hit with the shade it keeps throwing at Trump and his administration. It’s subtweeted Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ use of the word “historical,” confronted Kellyanne Conway’s use of “alternative facts” and schooled Sean Spicer with an explanation tweet defining “claquer,” or a group of people paid to applaud a speaker. Being a fan of Apple’s well-designed consumer devices isn’t too tough a row to hoe, of course, but it is a little grating to know that even the dictionary thinks you’re too easily influenced by Apple’s shiny gadgets. I’ll just have to console myself by grabbing one of those neat Smart Battery Cases. Via: MacRumors Source: Mirriam-Webster/Twitter Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Airbnb makes it easier for road warriors to find a room
Apr28

Airbnb makes it easier for road warriors to find a room

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Airbnb is becoming a more popular option for business travelers. Employees from more than 250,000 companies around the world have signed up to use it for work, the company says. So, Airbnb caters to these road warriors with a new search tool that shows only listings suited for business travel. What does that mean, exactly? According to Airbnb, it’s a location with amenities and services essential to business travelers, like Wi-Fi, laptop-friendly workspaces and self check-in. The company says more than 150,000 of those options around the world are currently available through its service. If you want to try the new search function, you’ll need to link your work email address to your Airbnb account. If you want to register as a business traveler with Airbnb, you can do that here. Airbnb’s attempts to cater to business travelers aren’t exactly new. It’s been trying to lure them in since 2014, when it launched a dedicated Business Travel portal. This year, it launched a third-party booking tool, so travelers and their managers can make reservation changes and message hosts with questions. It also introduced business-friendly receipts to streamline the expense process. Airbnb says it’s working on even more business-friendly features this year, including integration with corporate travel booking tools and easier access to amenities like gyms and co-working spaces. That’s surely bad news for the hotel industry, which is already putting legal pressure on the company. Earlier this year, the American Hotel and Lodging Association launched lobbying and research campaigns to convince politicians to “crack down” on Airbnb by imposing more regulatory restrictions. Via: The Verge Source: Airbnb Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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USPS solar eclipse stamps use body heat to reveal the moon
Apr28

USPS solar eclipse stamps use body heat to reveal the moon

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. The United States Postal Service is no stranger to letting its nerd flag fly with special edition stamps. The latest in its space series is a little different, though. Rather than just showing off celestial bodies or NASA spacecraft, the new stamps are a tribute to the upcoming total solar eclipse that should occur August 21st. Press your finger to the stamp and your body heat will transform its black circle centerpiece into an image of our moon. Once the heat dies down, the stamp image goes back to black. While it’s not as elaborate as you might think, this is something that’s sure to make philatelics smile. The USPS says this is its first time using thermochromic ink and that the set will be part of its Forever Stamp collection. So, three years from now, if you really need a stamp and postage price has increased, you won’t have to double up with additional stamps when sending that handwritten letter to grandma. Want to celebrate the stamp? Maybe plan a summer road trip to the University of Wyoming’s art museum for the postage’s First-Day-of-Issue ceremony on June 20th. Via: The Verge Source: USPS Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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NSA will stop illegally collecting American emails
Apr28

NSA will stop illegally collecting American emails

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. The National Security Agency has enjoyed relatively broad authority to monitor communications among suspected terrorists and their associates, even when those people happen to be American citizens and even without a warrant. However, The New York Times reports the NSA is stopping one of its most controversial practices: the collection of Americans’ international emails and text messages that mention a foreigner under surveillance. The NSA is attempting to adhere to a 2011 ruling by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court that found this particular “about the target” email collection program violated the Fourth Amendment. Some internet companies packaged and processed emails in bundles, and if one message contained a foreign target’s email address, the entire group was swept up in the NSA sweep. This meant the NSA was intercepting domestic communications, resulting in illegal searches. FISC allowed the surveillance to continue, but with a new safeguard in place: The NSA proposed a program where it would keep these bundled emails in a separate repository where analysts would not be able to see them. In 2016, the NSA reported the new program was not going as planned and analysts were, in fact, still searching the sequestered documents, The New York Times reports. FISC delayed renewing the agency’s warrantless surveillance program until it promised to cancel the entire “about the target” collection process. Source: The New York Times Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Vibrating utensils won't stop you from stuffing your face
Apr28

Vibrating utensils won't stop you from stuffing your face

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. The weight loss world is full of plausible-sounding advice. We’ve got apps to count calories, smart scales that measure our body fat and even vibrating utensils that promise to slow our eating down. The problem is really knowing which gadgets work and which are just as much empty fluff as a jar of that marshmallow stuff. Unfortunately, those vibrating forks seem to fall under the latter category, according to a new study published in science journal, Appetite. The study, titled “The effect of real-time vibrotactile feedback delivered through an augmented fork on eating rate, satiation, and food intake,” found that even when a smart fork slows people down when eating, it won’t result in eating less. People assigned the vibrating fork ended up eating a bite or so per minute less than the control group, but each cohort ended up eating the same 1.7 pounds of pasta bolognese during the time period measured, according to The Verge. That’s a lot of pasta, slowly consumed or not. Still, the study only tested eating patterns over 10 minutes — half the time other researchers say it takes for your body to feel the food in your stomach — so it’s hard to call the results utterly conclusive. The myth that eating slowly will help you lose weight continues to persevere, however, even with quite a few studies saying the opposite. Smart devices like the HAPIfork may indeed help you eat more slowly, but perhaps not slowly enough to make a difference in the amount you eat. If the current study’s conclusions are true, then vibrating utensils may only be as useful as that fitness tracker you never wear. Via: The Verge Source: Science Direct Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Your next Lego masterpiece is a $120 NASA Saturn V rocket
Apr28

Your next Lego masterpiece is a $120 NASA Saturn V rocket

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Lego has been inspired by NASA lately. Last month, the toymaker paid homage to women who made great contributions to the space agency, and now it’s revealing an Apollo Saturn V set that also looks incredible. As seen in the picture above, this rocket stands at a little more than three feet tall and can be positioned horizontally or vertically. The idea for the piece was born out of the company’s Lego Ideas program, which lets people from all over the world submit concepts they’d like to see get made. Made up of nearly 2,000 Lego pieces, the NASA Apollo Saturn V is expected to hit stores in June for $120 — which is a small price to pay to make your Moon-landing fantasies come true. Via: The Verge Source: Lego Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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I sat in on a virtual support group for sexual assault survivors
Apr28

I sat in on a virtual support group for sexual assault survivors

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Thanks to its ability to give you a first-person point of view, virtual reality has quickly become a vehicle for empathetic storytelling. Testimony, a VR project that premiered at Tribeca 2017, does so by putting you in a virtual support group, showing the effectiveness of simply watching people tell their stories themselves, especially when the subject is as personal and disturbing as sexual assault. With a Gear VR headset and headphones, I sat and listened to a series of accounts from sexual assault survivors, who would start talking when I looked at them. Their stories were cut into sections and chronologically arranged, and each person stopped talking when I looked away. In the virtual environment, you’ll see the survivors’ heads laid out on a web-like map. Each individual’s account consists of four or five sections that are tied to each other with a thin line, so you know where they begin and end. You can start at any part of each individual’s timeline. Testimony isn’t a VR “experience.” It’s not designed to transport you to the scene of a crime or force you to watch, horrified, as someone is attacked. Instead, it lets sexual assault survivors tell their stories in their own words, which is far more powerful than a reenactment. The accounts are straightforward, and don’t go into explicit detail. When your brain is forced to fill in the gaps left by the unspoken words, the sense of empathy is stronger than if you had simply watched the episode unfold. Then, there is the sheer power of witnessing a survivor struggle with their emotions while recounting the traumatizing incident. I know some survivors of sexual assault — they are all strong and inspirational people. But, even the most resilient of them have, in my experience, shied away from detailing what happened to them. It is rare to hear a survivor’s story told so vulnerably, and for anyone dealing with similar pain, Testimony provides a support group-like environment where they can find strength and solace in the privacy of their home. Testimony’s greatest strength lies in its focus on each individual’s journey after their assaults. When I heard that it took a year for one survivor to hear back from the police about her gang rape, and that all the officer had to say at that time was that they would “give the ringleader a call” a year later, I was outraged. And this theme of being failed by the legal system runs through all the accounts. As I jumped from person to person, the sense of injustice...

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The Galaxy S8's home button shifts to prevent screen burn
Apr28

The Galaxy S8's home button shifts to prevent screen burn

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Screensavers were originally a way to prevent burn-in on older CRT monitors. The now-classic moving images in early operating systems were created to keep any single pixel on the screen from remaining in place for too long, leaving behind a ghost on the display. Modern screens like the OLED ones on Samsung’s Galaxy S8 can also suffer from burn-in. Since the new flagship’s Home button is virtual now, the company had to do something to prevent it from getting burned in to your display. The solution? Moving the Home button image around a little bit. This subtle movement can only be seen with careful measurement but it’s definitely changing position by a pixel or two, notes Dutch site Galaxy Club. The feature was confirmed in an exchange between a Samsung superfan and the company’s official Dutch Twitter account, as well. @Samsung_NL Ques: “verspringt” de “Home-button” ook als je S8+ AOD aan hebt staan (zoals de andere info WEL verspringt), of…? — henklbr™ 🇳🇱 (@henklbr) April 24, 2017 Smartphone screens aren’t the only modern displays to deal with burn-in, either. LCD and Plasma screens can suffer from it, too. In fact, Android Wear devices that use OLED screens have a special anti-burn-in mode you can enable if you like to keep your smartwatch on all the time. Via: The Verge Source: Galaxy Club Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Uber puts you in control of your user data
Apr28

Uber puts you in control of your user data

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Uber is making removing the hurdles to deleting your account entirely. Like so many other services, simply uninstalling the app from your phone doesn’t wipe your data on the company’s servers. Not any more, according to The Verge. Rather than having to contact Uber support to eliminate your personal information, a forthcoming update adds the feature to the app itself. From the privacy settings you’ll apparently be able to start a 30-day countdown, and after the clock hits zero your customer data will go the way of the dodo. This isn’t a response to the #deleteUber social media campaign, the company stressed, telling The Verge that the feature has been in the the works for “more than a year.” Beyond that, the update will give you a little more control over how your location is used within the app. A new feature will let you drop a pin to show your friends where you are and it sounds like you’ll be able to disable GPS services entirely for more privacy. You’ll have to enter an address for pickups by hand, versus the app automatically pinpointing where you are, however. You know, in case you think that sharing an intersection versus your home’s or destination’s address is a bit too open to Big Brother. Is it enough to get you to come back to the ride-hailing service? Let us know in the comments. Via: The Verge Source: Uber Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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The best 360-degree camera
Apr28

The best 360-degree camera

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. By Jeff Carlson This post was done in partnership with The Wirecutter, a buyer’s guide to the best technology. When readers choose to buy The Wirecutter’s independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. Read the full article here. A 360-degree camera is great if you want to capture the full view of the summit on Half Dome or take in all of the surrounding architecture in the Piazza San Marco in Venice and share that experience on Facebook or YouTube so friends can pan around a scene and fully be there in the moment. After researching 360-degree cameras for 30 hours and testing four top contenders, we think the Ricoh Theta S is the best affordable, user-friendly entry point into this rapidly developing new category of photography. Who should buy this The appeal of 360-degree cameras is the ability for the viewer to see (and often hear) not just what’s in front of you, but the entire visual sphere of that location. 360-degree images and videos enable the viewer to look around independently, whether that’s by dragging within the picture window in an app or on a computer screen, or by moving their body while holding a phone or tablet that can register its place in 3D space. When you wear an inexpensive pair of Google Cardboard goggles or more advanced VR gear, the experience you record becomes fairly immersive. Ways to use 360-degree cameras are still evolving, but there are some scenarios that lend themselves to this kind of shooting. 360-degree cameras can function as an action camera, a POV camera, or a mounted camera. For more on these shooting styles, see our full guide. How we picked and tested The Ricoh, Nikon, 360Fly, and Samsung cameras. Photo: Jeff Carlson We started by reading reviews and combing through specifications for nearly 30 cameras that offer 360-degree recording capabilities. Based on a reader survey of how much you’d be willing to pay for a 360-degree camera, we then limited our scope to models priced under $600. Working on the assumption that more megapixels would be beneficial, especially when shooting video, we looked closely at 4K-capable models. But because only a small number of them currently exist, we brought in a Ricoh Theta S for testing to see how its HD video differed from 4K footage in real-world usage. We dismissed solutions like the GoPro Omni that require strapping together two or more cameras using novel brackets or cages for 360-degree coverage due to complexity. Ultimately, we were able to limit our contenders...

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Apple and Qualcomm's license dispute is getting nasty
Apr28

Apple and Qualcomm's license dispute is getting nasty

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Qualcomm’s ongoing legal dispute with Apple today took a new turn after the chipmaker accused its device-making partner of further withholding patent royalties. According to a statement, Apple recently stopped paying licensing revenue to manufacturers of the iPhone because it believes it’s been overpaying for important 3G and 4G patents. The legal battle started back in January when Apple sued Qualcomm for $1 billion for “abusing its clout” in the industry. Because the semiconductor giant enjoys a monopoly over important modem chips that connect devices to cellular or WiFi networks, it’s required to licence them under “fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory” terms. Apple argues it hasn’t done that, going as far as to claim that Qualcomm charges five times more than all of its other licensors combined. Qualcomm hasn’t taken the issue lightly. Earlier this month, it responded to Apple’s lawsuits with one of its own, accusing the iPhone-maker of underutilizing its modem chips in the iPhone 7 and misrepresenting the performance disparity between Qualcomm basebands and those of its rivals. Now, Apple is holding back money it owes to manufacturers of the iPhone. Qualcomm, for the most part, directly licenses its patents with partners, but Apple does things a little differently and pays partners like Foxconn that have their own agreements. It now expects to get no royalties during its current quarter. “Apple is improperly interfering with Qualcomm’s long-standing agreements with Qualcomm’s licensees,” said Don Rosenberg, EVP and general counsel of Qualcomm. “These license agreements remain valid and enforceable. While Apple has acknowledged that payment is owed for the use of Qualcomm’s valuable intellectual property, it nevertheless continues to interfere with our contracts. Apple has now unilaterally declared the contract terms unacceptable; the same terms that have applied to iPhones and cellular-enabled iPads for a decade.” The move has forced Qualcomm to amend financial estimates it published only last week. The company now sees third quarter revenue reaching between $4.8 billion and $5.6 billion, instead of $5.3 billion to $6.1 billion. Source: Qualcomm (PDF) Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Xbox chief envisions a Netflix model for narrative games
Apr28

Xbox chief envisions a Netflix model for narrative games

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Microsoft has just tipped its hand for what the company will show off at E3 in June. In a wide-ranging interview with The Guardian, Xbox chief Phil Spencer laid out his plans for the future of Xbox software. Since (mostly) fixing a majority of the problems the Xbox One hardware and system software has suffered through since 2013 with the Xbox One S and the Creator’s Update for Xbox firmware, Spencer is focusing on the other problem Microsoft faces: its dearth of unique and compelling reasons to buy into the improved Xbox platform. Spencer told The Guardian that his company has crowed about the consumer-facing side of what its online infrastructure offers (Xbox Live’s new features like clans), but now we’re going to start hearing about what that back-end can do for developers. Which, in turn, trickles back down to consumers. Part of that is opening up its Azure cloud servers to smaller developers as a means of helping them build a service-based game that’d otherwise be impossible due to the monumental costs of setting up infrastructure. Basically, Microsoft wants to do smaller scale versions of what it did for developer Respawn Entertainment’s debut title, the multiplayer-only Xbox-and-PC game Titanfall. He specifically cites Electronic Arts’ FIFA Ultimate Team as being a model for success in terms of service-based games. That might not be the best example, though. A card-trading game within FIFA proper, for quite awhile Ultimate Team was rife with folks exploiting the game, farming coins needed to buy high-skilled footballers. But Spencer does realize that not every type of game will work as a service; locking areas of games behind microtransactions or paywalls isn’t a good fit for, say, huge single-player action-adventure games. Regarding those, his comments were frank: “The audience for those big story-driven games… I won’t say isn’t as large, but they’re not as consistent. You’ll have things like Zelda or Horizon Zero Dawn that’ll come out, and they’ll do really well, but they don’t have the same impact they used to have, because the big service-based games are capturing such a large amount of the audience. “Sony’s first-party studios do a lot of these games, and they’re good at them, but outside of that, it’s difficult — they’re becoming more rare; it’s a difficult business decision for those teams, you’re fighting into more headwind.” Internally, Microsoft had Quantum Break last year, a big-budget narrative-driven game with no online multiplayer and zero post-launch add-ons. It was a unicorn for Microsoft if there ever was one. “We’ve got to understand that if we enjoy those...

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Vizio's new M-series 4K TVs are its real 2017 highlight
Apr28

Vizio's new M-series 4K TVs are its real 2017 highlight

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Last year, Vizio wowed us with its P-series 4K TVs, which delivered premium picture quality at a price much lower than other companies. But Vizio’s mid-range M-series sets also gained a reputation for being more affordable while still looking pretty good. This year, things are a bit different. Surprisingly, the 2017 P-series TVs are exactly the same as last year’s model. But the newer M-series “XLED” sets received some useful upgrades that will make them even more compelling to shoppers looking for a good deal. The 2017 M-series TVs, which start at $800 for the 50-inch model and go up to $3,000 for the 75-inch, still pack in 32 local dimming zones. That helps them deliver even backlighting and solid black levels. But this time around, they also have a wider color gamut and a higher peak brightness, reaching up to 600 nits. Both are features that previously required upgrading to the P-series line. The higher peak brightness means that light sources in some scenes pop a bit more, and the increased color range make images a bit more dynamic. Altogether, they make the M-series far better suited for showing off HDR (high-dynamic range) content, like the BBC’s luscious Planet Earth 2 4K Blu-ray. That’s ultimately a good thing, as HDR is a much more obvious visual upgrade than 4K alone. Vizio brought all of its new sets to NYC for a brief demo, and the M-series was clearly the most intriguing option. When compared to Samsung’s Q7 QLED TV, one of its flagship models for this year, black levels on the 65-inch Vizio set were significantly better. You can thank the local dimming backlight for that. Samsung’s TV, on the other hand, features an edge-lit backlight that disrupts black levels with light gray streaks. It was particularly apparent in a clip from Batman vs. Superman, where very bright on-screen elements caused the backlight to wash out everything around them. Beyond the black levels, colors and brightness on Vizio’s set looked about as good as the Q7. That’s impressive, given that the M-series 65-inch model goes for $1,500, while the Samsung set costs $4,000. If you’re looking for the best balance of value and picture quality, the M-series’ upgrades make the line significantly more compelling. It’s also an even better option if you’re in the market for an extra large TV. The 70-inch M-series will run you $2,000, while the 75-inch model goes for $3,000. The P-series, in comparison, costs $2,000 for the 65-inch and $3,500 for the 75-inch set. Technophiles will likely be fine shelling out the...

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'Dragon Quest XI' spawns the best and worst special edition consoles
Apr28

'Dragon Quest XI' spawns the best and worst special edition consoles

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Square Enix is on a bit of a merchandising mission in the lead up to the July release of Dragon Quest XI in Japan. For its latest trick, it’s partnered with Nintendo and Sony to today announce two new Dragon Quest consoles. The first is the black 2DS XL, with a matte silver slime bulging up from its lid, and a small Slime icon on the inside. There’s also stencil work on both the lid and base, which matches the gray software theme. It’s understated and rather lovely, and will be released on July 29th priced at 22,480 yen (about $200) in Japan. The second, a Dragon Quest PlayStation 4, is the antithesis of the Nintendo console. Styled with all the subtlety of a Thanksgiving Day Parade, it’s a standard slim PS4, albeit in a deep blue, emblazoned with a giant gold Emblem of Erdrick and a smaller slime. The DualShock 4 also has the same artifact festooned across its touchpad, and a slime on its right grip. Sony The chintziest detail is left for last, though — a gold slime USB cover that droops over the front of the console. It’s all a bit much. The Dragon Quest Heroes PS4 from a couple of years back had a similar USB cover, but all of the logos and icons were presented in grays and silvers and worked well with one another. Despite all this, I still kind of want both of the new consoles. The Dragon Quest PS4 and 2DS XL are currently only slated for Japanese release. Given the successful infiltration of the West with Builders, it’s not impossible that we might see some of this hardware in the US. Square Enix has commited to releasing more Dragon Quest titles outside of Asia after all. If not, there’s always importing. (The 2DS is region locked, the PlayStation 4 is not). Or, you could always settle for Hori’s crazy Slime DualShock 4: Via: Arkotype (Twitter) Source: Nintendo (JP), Sony (JP) Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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