MIT 3D-printed the shape-shifting future of pasta
May26

MIT 3D-printed the shape-shifting future of pasta

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. A new research project from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Tangible Media Group combines 3D printing, molecular gastronomy and macaroni. According to MIT News, researchers Wen Wang and Lining Yao have engineered flat sheets of gelatin and starch into shape-shifting noodles that react and fold when exposed to water. While Yao’s goal of one day creating a self-folding dumpling is still out of reach for now, the research team thinks their breakthrough could help reduce food shipping costs and lead to new trends in fine dining. Wang and Yao were actually working with bacterium that respond to humidity when they started playing around with edible materials that would have a similar effect. The noodles are made of thin layers of gelatin with different densities. As the dense top layer absorbs water, it bends over the less-dense bottom layer creating a simple piece of tube-shaped pasta. By 3D-printing strips of cellulose starch over the top layer, the research team was able to control the final shape of the noodles and create everything from traditional rigatoni to avant-garde mushrooms and blossoming flowers. To show off their research, the team worked even with chef Matthew Delisle from Boston’s L’Espalier restaurant to create noodles that could be incorporated into dishes worthy of their own Chef’s Table segment: While the noodles are definitely fun to look at, the Tangible Media Group came up with another, more pedestrian application for them as well: pasta makers could create flat-packed noodles to reduce volume, packaging waste and shipping costs. “We did some simple calculations, such as for macaroni pasta, and even if you pack it perfectly, you still will end up with 67 percent of the volume as air,” Wang said. “We thought maybe in the future our shape-changing food could be packed flat and save space.” While the MIT team had access to a lab-grade 3D printer and modeling software, they’ve also laid out instructions for creating shape-shifting pasta with lower-tech methods like screenprinting. There’s also a database of pasta patterns that anyone can use to print their own versions in the future and the team envisions a system where anyone can just order up custom pasta shapes online. There’s only one problem at the moment: while Wang says the noodles “had great texture and tasted pretty good,” her colleague Yao pointed out to Popular Science that the noodles are still mostly gelatin — meaning they’re pretty, but might not have the same satisfying starchiness of real pasta. Still, Yao is hopeful that her pasta research, which was partially funded by Target’s Food + Future...

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Theresa May wants to force tech giants to curb extremist content
May26

Theresa May wants to force tech giants to curb extremist content

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. British Prime Minister Theresa May called on global leaders at the G7 conference in Sicily to force internet and social media companies stop the spread of terrorist content available online. “Make no mistake: the fight is moving from the battlefield to the internet,” she said in a statement. May called on companies to develop tools to automatically identify and remove extremist materials, block the users who post it and report such activity to the authorities. The Prime Minister also announced the creation of an international forum to encourage industry leaders to share information and technologies to curb the spread of terrorist content. In addition, May proposed that regional governments cooperate by returning and prosecuting foreign fighters via improved “intelligence-sharing, evidence gathering and bolstering countries’ police and legal processes. The Guardian’s Anushka Asthana reported on Twitter that May’s initiatives have the backing of President Trump, as well. May’s comments come just days after a terrorist attack in Manchester. Her call is for governmental action, but tech companies have already stepped up to try and curb the spread of terrorism. Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter and Alphabet-owned YouTube are creating a shared database of “hashes” for any terror-related content they remove from their services. Twitter tripled the amount of terrorist accounts it suspended last year and Google launched a series of ads aimed at dissuading would-be terrorists from joining extremist organizations. Engadget has reached out to several tech companies for comment on this matter. Twitter responded by pointing us to this past March’s Transparency Report, which contains details on the company’s proactive steps to curb content like this. There is a fine line between protecting free speech and cracking down on violent groups bent on killing in the name of an extremist cause, of course. May’s proposals likely have the best of intentions to protect citizens around the globe, but some administrations some administrations have a mixed history of blanket solutions that may cause more harm than good. Via: BuzzFeed News, The Evening Standard Source: gov.UK Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Don't scream: The new 'Friday the 13th' game is out today
May26

Don't scream: The new 'Friday the 13th' game is out today

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. After a slight delay, the first official Friday the 13th game since 1989 is available today on PC, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. If you want to jump right into the action at Camp Crystal Lake, though, you might have to wait for Friday the 13th: The Game‘s servers to accommodate the apparent rush of people trying to kill the counselors/survive the maniacal Jason Voorhees. The official Twitter account has been dropping updates since the wee hours of this morning, so if you’re having issues make sure to check there first. WE ARE LIVE GO KILL EACH OTHER IN VIDEO GAMES AND SHIT. — Friday the 13th Game (@Friday13thGame) May 26, 2017 Source: Steam, PlayStation Store, Xbox Game Store, Kickstarter Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Sergey Brin’s secret airship will deliver aid and schlep his family
May26

Sergey Brin’s secret airship will deliver aid and schlep his family

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Last month, news dropped that Google co-founder Sergey Brin is building an airship on the sly — not a traditional airplane but an honest-to-god helium-filled dirigible. While he insisted the project wasn’t operating under the tech titan, which had previously announced backing its own “flying car,” it wasn’t clear what Brin would be doing with the world’s largest current aircraft. Now, details are starting to come out: Apparently, the zeppelin will split its time between delivering humanitarian supplies to remote locations and serving as a luxurious “air yacht” for Brin’s friends and family. Sources told The Guardian that Brin’s as-yet-unnamed aircraft will cost between $100m and $150m and be the largest flying object in the world (but still smaller than the iconic Hindenberg). While it can’t claim a title over its historical predecessor, it’s also filled with non-flammable helium, avoiding its superior’s tragic fate. While more details haven’t been revealed, as it’s still under construction in the Navy’s old wartime airship hangers in Northern California’s Ames airfield, the craft is planned to be 200m long — which is kind of hard to hide when Brin does decide to take it out for its first test drive. Source: The Guardian Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Forget flying cars and get ready for air taxis
May26

Forget flying cars and get ready for air taxis

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Flying cars are dumb. Yes, the cars in Blade Runner, The 5th Element and Back to the Future are cool, and who wouldn’t want to push a button and take to the sky in their Honda Civic? But it’s not going to happen any time in the next few decades, if ever. Frankly, the average driver can’t be trusted with anything that breaks free of the earth. Plus, adding potentially millions of vehicles to the sky is a logistical nightmare that’s sure to end in more than a few collisions that, unlike earth-based vehicles, would end with potentially hundreds of injured or killed bystanders. But that doesn’t mean the only time we’ll take to the skies for transit will be via international airports. Instead of flying cars, get ready for fleets of small “air taxis” zipping from hub to hub within a region, delivering passengers to their destinations. There’s a reason Uber is so bullish on this idea — it’s an outstanding complement to its current business model. The company wants a world where you take an Uber to one of its flight hubs, hop into a eVTOL (electric vertical take-off and landing) craft and be whisked to another hub on the other side of town. You’d then finish the trip in, you guessed it, an Uber. It’s also not too hard to imagine current airlines wanting in on the action too; most already offer commuter flights. Plus, of course, there’s going to be an onslaught of random startups hoping to be the “Uber of the sky.” But Uber’s dream requires partners, new regulations, a change to air traffic control and an infrastructure that doesn’t exist today. Plus, you need actual flying vehicles, whatever they might look like. Fortunately, there’s commercial interest in building these air taxis of the future. Airbus’ A3 and Aurora Flight Sciences (an Uber partner that happens to work with the DoD) are both working on eVTOL craft. Neither aircraft being developed by these companies resembles a car. Instead they look like futuristic tiny planes. Both take off like a helicopter but fly like a plane, which makes them perfect for short (under 50 to 60 miles) jaunts for two people. But as these get closer to full production (both companies are targeting 2020 for full-size test vehicles), it’s clear that one of those seats will be filled by a pilot. “Pilot” is probably not what the person behind the wheel (or maybe joystick) will be called. Maybe a controller is the better description. Flying one these multi-rotor craft would be impossible without a...

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Uber is free to operate in Italy on a long-term basis
May26

Uber is free to operate in Italy on a long-term basis

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. If you’re in Italy, you can use Uber. A court in Rome today annulled a temporary ban placed on Uber in early April that prevented the company from advertising and operating throughout the country. This didn’t completely stop Uber from infiltrating Italy, though: The ban was suspended about a week after its implementation as the company appealed, and Uber has been allowed to operate since then. Today’s ruling deletes the ban from the books entirely. “We are happy to announce that you will be able to keep using our app in Italy,” Uber Italy tweeted today, as translated by Reuters. Italian taxi drivers claim Uber unfairly penalizes their businesses because the app is loosely monitored; taxi drivers in the country operate under stiff regulations. The fight between traditional taxis and app-based services doesn’t end with today’s ruling — the Italian government promises to introduce clear regulations for ride-hailing apps by the end of the year. “We are thrilled for the thousands of drivers and riders who can continue using Uber in Italy,” a company spokesman tells Reuters. “However, Italy now needs to reform its outdated laws so that all its citizens and cities can benefit from modern technology.” This isn’t Uber’s first dust-up with frustrated taxi drivers and government officials: France, the UK and cities around the world have attempted to suspend or ban the app. Generally, these battles end with Uber operating in these places anyway under a new set of regulations tailored to the region. Source: Reuters Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Google will work with Vietnam to remove ‘toxic’ content
May26

Google will work with Vietnam to remove ‘toxic’ content

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. In line with recent agreements to prune their internet content in certain countries, Google’s parent company Alphabet will now work with Vietnam’s government to remove “toxic” information from its sites. The announcement came today following a meeting between Alphabet chairman Eric Schmidt and Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc. Earlier this year, Vietnam urged domestic companies to cease advertising with Facebook and YouTube until they cleaned up content it deemed offensive, “toxic” and anti-government. In their meeting, Schmidt assured the prime minister that the company would work with them to remove content that violates Vietnamese laws. This isn’t a new move. Last year, Google developed curated YouTube sites for Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka for similar reasons. However, on the other side of this issue, amid their ongoing battle with Chinese censorship, Google let users know when they were using search terms likely to be blocked by the government. And in 2014, the company shut down their Russian offices after severe crackdowns ordered by Putin. Alphabet notes that its collaboration with the Vietnamese government isn’t outside of their current policies for working with governments and is part of their ongoing attempt to comply with regional laws. “We have clear policies for removal requests from governments around the world, and those policies have not changed,” spokesman Taj Meadows told Reuters. While Vietnam doesn’t currently make up a substantial portion of Google’s operations, it’s one of Asia’s fastest growing economies, meaning there’s a financial incentive to comply with their laws — even if they are restrictive. Source: Reuters Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Almost every adult still watches TV the old-fashioned way
May26

Almost every adult still watches TV the old-fashioned way

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Surprise: an overwhelming majority of adults still watch TV on a TV despite cord-cutting and the prevalence of mobile broadband. 92 percent of those aged 18 and older according to a recent report from Nielsen, to be exact. “Sure, viewers have more options today, but when looking at platforms in a comparative fashion, it’s clear that consumers choose the television as the primary vehicle for [programming],” Tom Ziangas of AMC Research said in a blog post. The study found that of the gross minutes counted last year, 509,196,299,668 minutes (82.1 percent) were spent watching shows and movies via a flatscreen itself, and an additional 63,637,309,003 minutes (10.3 percent) came from TV-connected devices like game consoles. Among adults, watching videos on their computer, smartphone or tablet accounted for under eight percent of all viewing time. “What we found was that contrary to the popular narrative that smaller screens were talking away time from the TV glass, when we looked deeper we found that overall time spent viewing on the TV had the most minutes among every age or ethnic demographic we looked at,” Nielsen’s Peter Katsingris said. So, people really like watching stuff on a screen that’s too big to fit in their pocket or messenger bag despite having ready access to Netflix on the go. This potentially shows that even though cord-cutting has gone mainstream, a decent number of people either still have pay-TV subscriptions or use the smart apps built into their display versus a Roku device or a PlayStation. It’s almost as if folks took director David Lynch’s musing from a few years ago to heart without realizing it, too. “If you’re playing the movie on a telephone, you will never in a trillion years experience the film,” the filmmaker said in Keanu Reeve’s documentary Side by Side. “You’ll think you have experienced it, but you’ll be cheated. It’s such a sadness that you think you’ve seen a film on your fucking telephone. Get real.” Source: Nielsen (1), (2) Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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The exciting world of credit card terminals is coming to VR
May26

The exciting world of credit card terminals is coming to VR

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. In maybe the most boring VR announcement to date, payment processing company WorldPay has decided to bring its services to virtual worlds. The UK-based company, one of the leading payment processors worldwide, used the HTC Vive for its prototype. In their system, to pay for an in-game item you use the Vive’s controllers to pick it up, revealing a bubble with its price. Staring at the virtual price tag for a few seconds allows you to make the purchase, which you do with a virtual version of your real credit or debit card. You then hold your card over a VR payment terminal. And, if you need to type in a PIN, number bubbles pop up all around you in random order so that onlookers can’t guess your code. All in all, this VR payment is almost exactly like real life payments, which doesn’t seem terribly innovative. As we’ve moved away from using credit cards in real life purchases, one would think that there would be a better option for buying things in VR. Along with gaming purchases, WorldPay says it’s also interested in working with companies like Ikea that have started experimenting with VR in their own sales. A useful application once we phase out bulky VR headsets and controllers that would make real life payments cumbersome. Market research conducted by the company suggests the demand for VR payments will vary a lot by country. While 93 percent of Chinese citizens surveyed said they could see themselves using VR payments, only 35 percent of UK participants did. And zero percent of the people writing this article envision making VR payments anytime soon. Source: Bloomberg Technology Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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The best turntable for casual listening
May26

The best turntable for casual listening

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. By Chris Heinonen This post was done in partnership with The Wirecutter, a buyer’s guide to the best technology. When readers choose to buy The Wirecutter’s independently chosen editorial picks, it may earn affiliate commissions that support its work. Read the full article here. After spending over 50 total hours comparing turntables and measuring their performance, we’ve determined that the Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB is the best turntable for most people. It’s highly adjustable, has a built-in phono preamp for hassle-free setup, sounds great out of the box, and even has a built-in USB port if you want to digitize your LP collection. It’s also very speed-accurate, according to our tests. Who should get this These turntables are for people who are either first getting into vinyl playback, or have been out of it for a while and want a simple solution. Many of the turntables discussed here feature integrated phono preamps, which is important because signals from phono cartridges must be amplified and equalized to be compatible with normal stereo systems or powered speakers. Most new entry-level receivers lack phono preamp sections, and soundbars and wireless speakers never had them, so a built-in preamp can be important. If you already have a turntable that works for you, you probably don’t need to upgrade to a new turntable from this guide. You can likely get more out of your current turntable by upgrading the cartridge or getting a new phono preamp than you can from buying a whole new table. How we picked Ten turntables ready for testing. Photo: Chris Heinonen Since we last updated this guide more and more companies have jumped into the turntable game. Vinyl sales have risen through the past decade, and audio companies want to capitalize on the trend. Many turntable brands have introduced new and ostensibly improved models since our last update. We brought in nine new or updated turntables to compare with our existing pick, the Audio-Technica LP120. We listened to all of the turntables in a dedicated home theater room that measures 11 by 13 by 8 feet. For direct comparison, we played identical copies of an album on multiple turntables using a line-level audio switcher. We also considered belt-drive and direct-drive models for this guide. To learn more about these models, see our full guide. Our pick Photo: Chris Heinonen The Audio-Technica AT-LP120-USB is the best turntable for most people because it sounds great, has an internal phono preamp, is speed-accurate, and lets you easily digitize your LP collection. The AT-LP120-USB is a great entry point for the vinyl enthusiast, with...

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Facebook and Google ask Congress for surveillance reform (again)
May26

Facebook and Google ask Congress for surveillance reform (again)

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. It’s no secret that the American government monitors the web data of non-citizens it considers potential threats. But major tech companies such as Facebook, Microsoft, and Google are looking to change the way that surveillance is handled by the government. The government is authorized to look through the web activity of non-US citizens located outside the United States through Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which is set to expire at the end of the year. The US House of Representatives argues that, “FISA Section 702 is one of the most important legal authorities to stop terrorist attacks.” The tech companies don’t disagree — they aren’t campaigning against reauthorization — but in a letter obtained by Axios, they’re asking that specific privacy-related concerns be addressed. Companies such as Uber, Facebook, Google, Microsoft, and Snap want more government oversight of surveillance. They also want to disclose more about the specific requests they receive under this law, though it’s not clear what the terms of disclosure would be. Additionally, tech companies are trying “reduce the likelihood of collecting information about non-US persons who are not suspected of wrongdoing,” the letter says. More than 30 companies signed the letter, though, strangely, Apple was not among them. (We’ve reached out to Apple for comment, but have yet to hear back.) It doesn’t help that Congress has specific concerns about the number of Americans whose data has been collected (illegally) under FISA, which is only supposed to cover non-US citizens living in foreign countries. Privacy is such an important issue, especially as our personal details and web data are increasingly treated as a commodity. The United States government believes it’s important to examine the web data of certain non-US citizens to prevent terror attacks and other anti-US actions, and companies like Facebook and Google are caught in the middle. These companies handle overwhelming amounts of sensitive information, and keeping their users’ trust and protecting their privacy is crucial. When national security is involved, these two issues come into conflict. It’s understandable that tech companies want to protect themselves and their users, but balancing the demands of national security with respect of users’ privacy is not easy. Source: House of Representatives, Axiom Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Windows metadata bug has been waiting to cripple older machines
May26

Windows metadata bug has been waiting to cripple older machines

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. If you’re still using Windows 7 or Windows 8, there’s another security issue you need to be aware of aside from Wannacry. This one won’t hold your computer ransom for bitcoin, though. Actually, it might be more annoying than it is dangerous. Researchers from Aladdin RD, an information security company, recently discovered (translated) that a bad image call embedded into a website can bring older computers to a grinding halt. In this case, it’s filename “$mft.” As Ars Technica points out, it’s a metadata file that exists in the root directory of the OS’ NTFS file system. When something tries using it, like a malicious website accessed through Internet Explorer in this case, the NTFS driver never releases its lock on the file. This in turn blocks other legitimate processes from accessing the file system. From here, every program trying to access any type of file will start to hang and you can see where this is going. Now, this type of vulnerability isn’t new (older versions of Windows had similar responses calls for c:concon), and neither is the fix. Simply reboot your machine and you should be good to go. Microsoft is aware of the problem, but isn’t going to fix the bug in Windows Vista. Considering that Redmond is still supporting Windows 7 and Windows 8 there may be a patch coming, though. We’ve reached out for more information and will update this post should it arrive. Via: Ars Technica Source: Aladdin RD (Russian) Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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A Paris school is using AI to monitor distracted students
May26

A Paris school is using AI to monitor distracted students

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. For those of us who zone out during university lectures, the temptation multiplies when you taking classes from home. Next fall, a business school in France will try to stop online students from getting distracted with an AI app called Nestor. To judge your level of attention, it can track your face and eyes and even detect when you pull out a phone. If you start to slack off, it can warn you via pop-up messages or emails, and tell you roughly when you may drift away again. The bot will be used for two classes at the ESG Business school, including a 30 hour “street marketing” course, as part of a distance learning program. Eventually, it’ll be offered as part of live lectures and used in conjunction with a camera that can analyze students live to see if they’re engaged or bored, ESG says. It can then, believe it or not, send a text or notification as a virtual kick in the rear. The data from the program will also be useful to teachers, letting them know which parts of their lectures are grabbing students and which parts aren’t. The developers say it could also help students in different ways — if you let it track your online activities, it could proposed a personalized course schedule based on times when you’re watching YouTube, for instance. Marcel Saucet, head of the company that created the bot, said that Nestor won’t store video footage nor sell it to advertisers, a promise suspicious students might take with a grain of salt. The data will also be encrypted and anonymous, the company promised. As The Verge notes, ESG is not the first first school using AI that way, as the IE Business School in Madrid uses an “emotion recognition system” to spot inattentive students. Via: The Verge Source: ESGCI Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Truly intelligent enemies could change the face of gaming
May26

Truly intelligent enemies could change the face of gaming

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Live, die, repeat — the tagline for the 2014 science-fiction film Edge of Tomorrow — describes its protagonist, who “respawned” every time he died in the real world. Critics noted that the conceit resembled the cyclical experience of playing a video game, in which dying resets a staged arrangement of obstacles. Often these are enemies, and the most common way they’re surpassed is by the player violently dispatching them. Some games have kept this as cartoonish as Mario jumping on a Goomba’s head, but others strive for vivid action and more-lifelike foes to pit the player against. But we know what enemies look like today — how will we treat them in the games to come? Put another way: How will violence in gaming change in the future? The question is broad, and a little loaded. Gaming’s evolution was stricken by moral panic about the effect of violent video games on kids. In those days, Mortal Kombat and Doom convinced the fearful that engaging in bloody digital combat — as real as it looked in glorious 16-bit — would warp players’ minds. This cultural anxiety still spikes from time to time, but as those youths grew into adults no more prone to carnage than anyone else, the argument’s long lost its teeth. Freed from cultural pillories, gaming started looking inward. As the industry yearns for artistic respect, critics are asking more of violent games. In the mainstream big-studio titles, we still shoot, stab and detonate digital enemies, but some see the relationship between players and foes as ripe for exploring. One of the most popular games that ventured into this territory was Shadow of Mordor. Released by studio Monolith Productions in September 2014, Mordor placed the player in the boots of Talion, a Ranger of Gondor who is unjustly killed. His body possessed by a wraith, Talion becomes a revenant obsessed with avenging the murder of his family, while the elven ghost inside him remembers a forgotten past. His wraithlike powers enable him to mentally dominate Orcs and set them on their former comrades. The murky moralism — you essentially enslave Orcs but use them for “good” — and brutal violence disturbed some reviewers, but it didn’t stunt the game’s success. Monolith is gearing up to release a sequel, Shadow of War, this August. This time around, Orcs follow Talion willingly as he challenges Sauron for rule of Middle-Earth, fighting his enemies (Orcs still faithful to Mordor) and even forming a bodyguard cadre to protect their leader. Ditching mind control in favor of a strongman cult creates a...

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'Far Cry 5' brings cult mayhem to Hope County February 27th
May26

'Far Cry 5' brings cult mayhem to Hope County February 27th

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Far Cry 5 is going to be a little different than you might expect. The new announcement trailer paints a picture of pastoral life that lends itself surprisingly well to the franchise’s familiar trappings: hunting, off-road vehicles, airplanes and guns. And it seemingly wraps it all together in a way that seems like a more grounded version of Grand Theft Auto V‘s depiction of a rural life of crime. As hinted at by the cover art reveal, religion plays a big role here as well. The Eden’s Gate cult is terrorizing the local community under the guise of saving the residents’ souls. Naturally that involves forced baptisms/drownings and holding a gun against someone’s head while also holding what looks like a bible. You know, light narrative fare. The development team spent a few weeks in Montana doing on-site research and also studied religious cults in an attempt to depict them correctly, the PlayStation Blog notes. Rather than focus on one central villain as in games past, the idea here was to build a realistic framework around Joseph Seed, the leader of Eden’s Gate. “We look back at some of the characters that we’ve created before, and we’ve had those key moments where you sit down with them, and you look at them eye to eye,” creative director Dan Hay says. “But we kind of did it with one character at a time, and each game was a face-off. This time, we thought it’d be really interesting if we created a cast of characters like that.” So, there’s Jacob the head of security; John, a lawyer who advances the cult’s public presence and Faith who “keeps the cult’s members pacified.” Ubisoft promises that there will be more revealed during its E3 media briefing on June 12th, but if you’re curious for more before then, there’s plenty of info tucked away on the game’s official website. The trailer says that this was captured from in-engine footage, but maybe don’t expect actual gameplay visuals to look exactly like this next February 27th on your PC, PlayStation 4 or Xbox One. Source: Ubisoft (YouTube), PlayStation Blog Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Everything you need to know about mobile Amber Alerts
May26

Everything you need to know about mobile Amber Alerts

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. At 2:38 PM on May 19th, 2017, my phone buzzed, emitting a high-pitched tone. So did the phone of my colleague Roberto Baldwin, who was standing with me in a Starbucks near our office. Actually, all of the phones in that Starbucks buzzed at the same time, setting off a cacophony of synchronized alarms. An Amber Alert had just gone out for a missing 1-year-old child, last seen in a 2000 tan Toyota Corolla. And everyone in that Starbucks, and possibly the whole of San Francisco Bay Area, saw the same message at the same time. Up until about five years ago, this wouldn’t have been possible. That’s because it was only in December 2012 that the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) started to implement the Wireless Emergency Alert program, which is the one responsible for that aforementioned high-pitched tone. The Wireless Emergency Alert program (also known as the Commercial Mobile Alert system) is used not just for Amber Alerts, but also to warn the public about natural disasters and imminent threats. Alerts can be issued by the National Weather Service, the office of the president of the United States and emergency operation centers. Think of it as the Emergency Broadcast System, but instead of appearing on radio and TV, it’s on your phone. Still, when most people think of these emergency notifications, they think of Amber Alerts, simply because they occur more often. The US Department of Justice started the Amber Alert program in 1996 in honor of 9-year-old Amber Hagerman, who was abducted and murdered in Arlington, Texas. The word “Amber” also stands for “America’s Missing: Broadcast Emergency Response Plan.” According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the Amber Alert program is “a voluntary partnership between law enforcement, broadcasters and transportation agencies to activate an urgent bulletin in the most serious child-abduction cases.” Before this, if you wanted to receive Amber Alerts on your phone, you had to opt-in with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. The program was simply called the Wireless Amber Alert program, and you’d have to not only sign up online but also specify which locations you wanted to get alerts from. Only around 700,000 or so people did this, so its reach was limited. Now, anyone with a cellphone receives the alerts by default. While the previous Wireless Amber Alert program was SMS text-based, the current Emergency Alert program uses a technology called Cell Broadcast, which delivers messages to all phones within range of designated cell towers. It doesn’t send the message to individual recipients, so...

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Oculus Rift officially supports the HTC Vive’s best feature
May26

Oculus Rift officially supports the HTC Vive’s best feature

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. The Oculus Rift has technically supported room-scale VR since the system’s Touch motion controllers first went on sale last December. But purchasing an additional sensor didn’t guarantee foolproof 3D tracking for greater immersion right off the bat. Oculus labelled the feature “experimental,” alerting early adopters to the likelihood of bugs and other gremlins you might expect from in-development functionality. Six months and several updates later, however, Oculus has decided room-scale support is robust enough in its latest software release that it can ditch the beta tag and be called a bona fide Rift feature. HTC’s Vive headset supported room-scale VR from the get-go, and Oculus has been playing catch-up for some time now. In its experimental phase, the Rift’s implementation wasn’t exactly user-friendly, leading Oculus to craft a four-part blog series conveying setup advice and educating owners about compatibility issues with older USB standards, among other things. While this may still serve as useful reference material, the notes accompanying the version 1.15 software release state “tracking with three sensors is now fully supported,” meaning there shouldn’t be any major issues getting it up and running. Via: TechCrunch Source: Oculus Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Time-bending shooter 'Superhot VR' arrives on HTC Vive
May26

Time-bending shooter 'Superhot VR' arrives on HTC Vive

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Superhot VR didn’t start life as an Oculus Rift game, but it eventually made it to the VR headset. With dual-wielding guns and further tweaks to improve the title for a new interface, it turned into a short-but-sweet slice of virtual reality gaming. Now it’s HTC Vive owners’ turn to slow time, evade bullets, and return them in kind. At least, officially. More enthusiastic Vive gamers have been able to tap into ReVive, a software workaround that let Steam VR users access to Oculus exclusives like Superhot VR since last year. That said, Github files and a little bit of hard work aren’t for all of us, and the official release on Steam is a good sign for the remaining Vive owners looking for a VR title to tide them over until E3 next month. The game’s posit is cleverly simple: Time moves forward as you do. It’s arguably more of a puzzle game than shooter, as you plan your movement through levels to avoid getting trapped — and then filled with bullets. Available on Steam now, Superhot VR is launching with an early-bird 20 percent discount (down to $20) through til the start of June. Via: Techradar Source: Steam Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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'Pokémon Go' update gives cheaters lousy monsters
May26

'Pokémon Go' update gives cheaters lousy monsters

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. With a new update, Pokémon Go cheaters won’t be banned, but instead thrown into a depressing purgatory. As spotted by Reddit’s hardcore Pokémon Go site, Silph Road, Niantic is now “shadowbanning” cheaters by only letting them find humdrum monsters like Pidgey. In a statement, Niantic support said “people who violate the Pokémon Go Terms of Service may have their gameplay affected and may not be able to see all the Pokémon around them.” For instance, cheaters often use bots that falsify their locations or power scanners to show the locations of the sweetest Pokémon. That way, you can find a Pikachu and catch it from your couch rather than hiking several miles to the local power plant. If Niantic has flagged you as an “illicit” player, however, the best you can probably hope for is a Magikarp. Silph Road’s mods wrote that “huge numbers of bot accounts were being flagged, though many were still operating normally.” Users have debated why specific accounts were getting the hammer, with one theory being that Niantic is cracking down on accounts trying to access its private servers. That doesn’t appear to be the only reason, though, and Niantic itself is obviously not saying. “While we cannot discuss the systems implemented, we can confirm that we are constantly refining new ways to ensure the integrity of the game in order to keep it fun and fair for all Trainers,” its statement reads. Via: TNW Source: The Silph Road (Reddit), NianticGeorge (Reddit) Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Kodak's chunky, retro cameraphone is coming to the US
May26

Kodak's chunky, retro cameraphone is coming to the US

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. You might not hear much about Kodak these days, but the brand still exists — it even released a new smartphone with a humongous camera in Europe last year. Now, that same phone named after its Ektra camera from the ’40s has made its way to the US. As a phone, the new Ektra doesn’t really have impressive features with its 5-inch 1080p display, 32GB internal storage, deca-core MediaTek Helio X20 processor and 3GB of RAM. It also ships with Android Marshmallow instead of Nougat. Ektra’s main draw is none other than its 21MP camera (with six-axis image stabilization, no less) that takes up a huge chunk of its leatherette-wrapped back. The company says the camera, which has optical image stabilization features, has a fully-integrated DSLR dial experience and can shoot 4K videos. Its counterpart front-facing camera is 13 megapixels, and both of them use Snapseed as the default photo-editing app. Seeing as loads of better smartphones have decent camera these days, we’re guessing Ektra will appeal to those who want that old-timey Kodak aesthetic the most. If this is something you’d buy, head over to the company’s website, where’s it’s selling the phone for $400 as an unlocked GSM device. Via: The Verge Source: Kodak Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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The Morning After: Friday, May 26th 2017
May26

The Morning After: Friday, May 26th 2017

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Welcome to Friday morning. In the last 24 hours, we gazed at SpaceX’s latest rocket tests, hear about major financial companies involving themselves in bitcoin. Meanwhile, Microsoft’s Twitch competitor has (sort of) relaunched with a new name and the ability to broadcast all your buddies playing at once. We’ll wait.Android co-founder Andy Rubin will reveal ‘something big’ May 30th With a resume that includes the Android platform and the Sidekick, you can bet we’ll be paying attention to Andy Rubin’s company Essential Products, when it reveals “something big” in a few days. Pics have teased a mobile device, and another image yesterday hinted at a 360-degree camera add-on. Stay tuned. As Elon Musk says, the launch is ‘guaranteed to be exciting.’ SpaceX begins test-firing parts of its biggest rocket SpaceX is trying out some of its boosters — and they’re big. After releasing a clip of last week’s test-fire, Elon Musk tweeted that, when the Falcon Heavy eventually launches this summer, it’ll be this powerful, but “times three.” You can even use it in the cafeteria Fidelity Investments dives into bitcoin Starting later this year, Fidelity clients will be able to check their bitcoin balance through the company’s website, as long it’s stored on Coinbase. A vote of confidence from Fidelity’s CEO arrives while the cryptocurrency is trading at an all-time high, and suggests that eight years in, it could be here to stay. It’s all up to you.T-Mobile’s flexible Digits plans come out of beta on May 31st The latest UnCarrier wrinkle out of Big Magenta is “Digits,” a service that lets users mix and match numbers and devices as they wish. Similar to Google Voice, it can sync messages and calls across devices, or support multiple numbers that all point to the same handset. All current customers will be upgraded to Digits at the end of this month, and purchasing an additional line will cost $10 per month for most. Physical shops will borrow tricks from the web to deliver ultimate convenience. Your mall will basically have to be psychic to survive For some of us, the rush we get from buying a new dress or gadget can be cathartic. And in the not-too-distant future, real-world shopping will get so seamless that it could feel like the store is actually psychic. But it’s not just about flashy displays of bleeding-edge tech. Instead, expect a subtler approach that focuses on understanding your tastes to find you your next outfit while you’re in the fitting room, all in the right size. Stores will learn to recognize you as...

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The ‘Monster Hunter’ series is coming to Nintendo's Switch
May26

The ‘Monster Hunter’ series is coming to Nintendo's Switch

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. We knew it was going to happen. Capcom will be bringing its hugely popular (at least in Japan) action RPG to Nintendo’s hybrid console, although the first title won’t be a completely new iteration. Monster Hunter XX is pitched as an expanded edition of Monster Hunter Generations, which launched on the 3DS two years ago. (MHXX is not the twentieth game from the series, however, you’re meant to pronounce it “double cross”.) The Monster Hunter series could make an ideal fit for the Switch, with the ability to explore and hunt… monsters with either local players or online allies — and look! You already have analog sticks, rejoice! Capcom’s holding off from offering any insight into what will be added to the Switch upgrade, but expect to hear more in a few days at the Monster Hunter Championships this weekend. It’s being held, naturally, in Japan. Source: Capcom (Japanese) Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Raspberry Pi is merging with a coding foundation
May26

Raspberry Pi is merging with a coding foundation

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Raspberry Pi’s credit card-sized computers have helped kickstart a coding revolution. Thanks to their low cost, major companies like Google and VMWare have distributed thousands of the DIY boards to children all over the world in the hope that it’ll inspire the next generation of computer scientists. The Raspberry Pi Foundation routinely works with educational partners to get its computers in the right hands, and its latest announcement is set to boost that outreach even more. Today, the foundation confirmed that it is to merge with CoderDojo to form what it believes will be the biggest code-promoting organization on the planet. CoderDojo, if you’re not aware, is a Dublin-based organization that focuses on getting young people coding. It facilitates the creation of volunteer-run programming clubs for youngsters aged between 7 to 17. The organization says that there are more than 1,250 CoderDojos in 69 countries, which serve more than 35,000 children and teenagers. While the Raspberry Pi Foundation is best known for its cheap computing boards, it also has a vocal and passionate community. It offers resources to help support educators who want to teach coding and also runs its Code Club network of programming clubs for children aged between 9 and 13 (which are attended by over 150,000 kids a week). Code Club wasn’t its own creation, though — the Foundation merged with the eponymous organization back in 2015. Looking at numbers alone, it’s easy to see why Raspberry Pi and CoderDojo are a good fit. Plus, it’s something the hardware maker has done successfully in the past. While their programming clubs may slightly differ, both organizations agree there is “a need and room for both.” Raspberry Pi Foundation CEO Eben Upton recently said that the organization would move away from major product launches and focus more on software, as well as “doubling down” on its charitable work. Today’s announcement suggests that dream is becoming a reality. “Raspberry Pi will work closely with CoderDojo to advance our shared goals, pooling our resources and expertise to get more adult volunteers and young people involved in the movement,” said the Raspberry Pi Foundation a statement. “Our combined scale will allow us to invest more in the infrastructure and systems that underpin our work, and to offer a wider range of products and services to our communities.” Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Second-gen Moto 360 smartwatches will get Android Wear 2.0 soon
May26

Second-gen Moto 360 smartwatches will get Android Wear 2.0 soon

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. A bunch of smartwatches got Android Wear 2.0 when it finally came out in April, but sadly, Moto 360 wasn’t one of them. The company promised a late-May availability, and it sounds like it’s staying true to its word. Motorola Support’s Twitter account has revealed that the updated OS will soon start rolling out to second-gen Moto 360s in phases — it might have even begun yesterday, which means some people could already have updated devices. The long-delayed Wear 2.0 comes with a new user interface that was especially designed for computing on a tiny screen. It reduces the number of clicks and swipes needed to navigate the OS, and it puts the Play Store right on your smartwatch so you can download apps directly. The platform also adds Google Assistant to your device, giving you an easy way to make a query or to control your apps with voice commands. Before you celebrate, though, make sure that what you have is the base second-gen version. The Moto 360 Sport will eventually get an update, but it won’t be anytime soon. As for the first-gen Moto 360, the company is unfortunately leaving it out of the update altogether. @NamelessWing @Moto Happy to report that AndroidWear 2.0 will start rolling out in phases on Moto 360 2nd Gen, possibly as early as today. — Motorola Support (@Moto_Support) May 25, 2017 Via: 9to5google Source: Motorola Support Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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SmartCar connects Facebook's chatbot to your Tesla
May25

SmartCar connects Facebook's chatbot to your Tesla

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. We’ve seen AI-powered chatbots for almost everything, and now a company called Smartcar has developed one specifically for Tesla electric vehicles. Owners can access any number of features via Tesla’s mobile app, and by logging in via TeslaBot, they can pop open Facebook Messenger to ask questions or send commands. That’s a pretty low bar for use, particularly compared to the Tesla app Smartcar’s founder developed for Google Glass. Of course, most of us don’t have a Tesla yet (at least until the Model 3 comes out), but we could see more tech like this quickly, as Smartcar is already working with Hyundai on its Ioniq platform. Source: TeslaBot AI (Facebook Messenger), TeslaBot.ai Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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The educational games of your youth have their own museum exhibit
May25

The educational games of your youth have their own museum exhibit

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. The Minnesota Education Computing Corporation might not be the most recognizable game developer today, but if you went to elementary school in the US anytime in the eighties or nineties, then you’ve almost certainly played — and probably learned something from — one of its educational games. The company started in 1973 as an initiative to put more computers into classrooms across Minnesota and eventually created over 300 different software titles, including the version of The Oregon Trail that became the cultural touchstone it is today. Now MECC and The Oregon Trail are finally getting the recognition they deserve in a retrospective exhibit from the Strong, the National Museum of Play. The museum actually inducted The Oregon Trail into the Video Game Hall of Fame back in 2016, and the new exhibit will include playable original versions of the game so younger generations can experience the excitement of hunting for buffalo in all it’s 8-bit glory. Aside from teaching countless schoolkids grammar with Word Munchers, MECC is also considered a pioneer in STEM education that popularized computer learning. To preserve that legacy, a group of former MECC employees, including Oregon Trail co-creator Don Rawitsch and co-founder Dale LaFrenz, recently donated a cache of documents, videos, and software to the museum that will show how the company evolved from a part of the public school system to a beloved piece of our collective memories. The Oregon Trail, MECC, and the Rise of Computer Learning exhibit officially opens on June 17th. But if you can’t make it to Rochester, New York, you can also explore and play the original on Archive.org or take a trip down memory lane on MECC’s own site. Source: The Museum of Play Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Android exploit adds secret, thieving layers to your phone
May25

Android exploit adds secret, thieving layers to your phone

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Researchers from UC Santa Barbara and Georgia Tech have discovered a fresh class of Android attacks, called Cloak and Dagger, that can operate secretly on a phone, allowing hackers to log keystrokes, install software and otherwise control a device without alerting its owner. Cloak and Dagger exploits take advantage of the Android UI, and they require just two permissions to get rolling: SYSTEM ALERT WINDOW (“draw on top”) and BIND ACCESSIBILITY SERVICE (“a11y”). This concerns researchers because Android automatically grants the draw-on-top permission for any app downloaded from the Play Store, and once a hacker is in, it’s possible to trick someone into granting the a11y permission. A Cloak and Dagger-enabled app hides a layer of malicious activity under seemingly harmless visuals, luring users to click on unseen buttons and keystroke loggers. “To make things worse, we noticed that the accessibility app can inject the events, unlock the phone, and interact with any other app while the phone screen remains off,” the researchers write. “That is, an attacker can perform a series of malicious operations with the screen completely off and, at the end, it can lock the phone back, leaving the user completely in the dark.” Google is aware of the exploit. “We’ve been in close touch with the researchers and, as always, we appreciate their efforts to help keep our users safer,” a spokesperson says. “We have updated Google Play Protect — our security services on all Android devices with Google Play — to detect and prevent the installation of these apps. Prior to this report, we had already built new security protections into Android O that will further strengthen our protection from these issues, moving forward.” One of the researchers, Yanick Fratantonio, tells TechCrunch the recent updates to Android O might address Cloak and Dagger, and the team will test it out and update its website accordingly. For now, he says, don’t download random apps and keep an eye on those permissions. Source: Cloak and Dagger Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Keybase brings seamless encrypted chats to anyone on the web
May25

Keybase brings seamless encrypted chats to anyone on the web

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Keybase is on a mission to make end-to-end encryption as easy as possible, everywhere you go online. After launching frictionless encrypted file sharing last year, the open-source security company rolled out Keybase Chat, a desktop and mobile chat app that allows users to send encrypted messages to anyone on the internet using just their Twitter, Facebook or Reddit username. Today, Keybase announced a few new launches that will make it even easier to send encrypted messages to anyone — even if your recipient isn’t set up to receive them yet. First, up a new Chrome extension adds an encrypted message button to user profiles on any of the social networks Keybase supports. (Aside from Twitter, Facebook and Reddit, the service also works with Hacker News and GitHub accounts.) If the user you’re trying to message isn’t already signed up for Keybase, they’ll be notified via the social network they’re on that they have an encrypted message waiting for them. The extension works alongside the Keybase desktop app, so your messages are encrypted end-to-end and they will be stored and unreadable until the recipient unlocks it. If you don’t use Chrome, you can also use the main app to search for social media profiles and send a message from there. Speaking of the the app, Keybase Chat has also quietly made its way to Linux and Windows 10 machines, as well as mobile devices on Android and iOS. Since the project is open source, the company is still refining and adding features as more users come on board. Most importantly though, founder Chris Coyne has committed to implementing advanced blocking and abuse reporting features, which is important when you consider everyone on the web now has an encrypted inbox waiting for them. Source: Keybase Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Amazon opens its first drive-through grocery store
May25

Amazon opens its first drive-through grocery store

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Need to pick up some supplies but can’t be bothered to walk across a parking lot for them? Amazon’s got you covered. In Seattle on Thursday, the company opened a grocery store that doesn’t require you leave your vehicle, promising customers will only have to “drive in… and drive out.” The service, dubbed AmazonFresh Pickup, is now live at two locations: in the SODO and Ballard neighborhoods. It’s free for Prime members and there is no minimum order amount. Customers simply place their order online, drive to the store and wait. Once the order is ready, an employee wheels it out to the car and puts it in the trunk. That’s it. The stores carry everything you’d expect to find at your local supermarket, albeit at a significantly higher price. Expect to pay $1 per lemon, $6.60 for a gallon of milk and $1.29 per apple. Or you can just do your shopping like you always have and save some cash. Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Popular iOS notes app Bear adds sketching (and stickers)
May25

Popular iOS notes app Bear adds sketching (and stickers)

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Bear, a fast, lightweight and lovely note-taking app for iOS and the Mac, has been building a following over the past year or so. The app’s excellent design, small but essential feature set and steady stream of updates have made it worth its subscription cost ($14.99 per year or $1.49 per month, though you can get most of its features for free). Today, a pretty major update is rolling out to the iOS app: Bear now supports sketching. In keeping with Bear’s focus on essentials, the sketching feature includes two different brushes, each with three different widths and a variety of colors. You can use your finger or a stylus, including the Apple Pencil on the iPad Pro, and drawings sync across your iPhone, iPad and Mac provided you’re a subscriber. But you can only create and edit drawings on the iPhone or iPad; on the Mac you can just view your scribbles. Those images live as attachments to text notes just like any other picture you bring into Bear. Another iOS-only feature is stickers for iMessage, because why not? As you might expect, they encompass a cute bear doing a variety of cute things. The last little update pertains to the app’s visual themes — now, when you change the app’s theme, it’ll also change the home screen icon on your phone or the dock icon on your Mac. But the main attraction is obviously sketching. While I don’t want Bear’s developers to add too many features and make the app into a bloated monster, pretty much every notes app out there (including Apple’s Notes app) supports drawing to some extent. Having it in Bear just makes good sense. Source: Bear Writer Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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