Google’s upcoming Nexus phone might look like this
Aug17

Google’s upcoming Nexus phone might look like this

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. We know another Nexus smartphone is coming soon, but built by whom? Both Huawei and LG are rumored to be making Google’s reference device for Android M, and we now have pretty solid evidence for LG. A picture of the device from an Indonesian G+ user spotted by blogger Marques Brownlee shows the back of an LG Nexus device. Size-wise, it appears to line up with the 5.2-inch rumors and also features a rear fingerprint scanner, bulging camera, laser focus, dual-LED, iPhone 6-style flash and plastic galore. If the device is for real, all that plastic might not be a bad thing, as it could mean that Google’s next handset will be more affordable than its last one, the Motorola Nexus 6. A previous render from @Onleaks matches the photo closely, and also shows a USB Type-C port. Rounding out the specs, the device is supposed to have a Qualcomm Snapdragon 808 CPU.         Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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MacBook Air’s super fast disk speeds come from Samsung SSDs
Mar12

MacBook Air’s super fast disk speeds come from Samsung SSDs

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Lost in the news of Retina-equipped, 12-inch MacBook was the arrival of all-new MacBook Air models with the latest Intel HD6000 graphics and CPUs. Apple also boasted that the 13-inch version has disk speeds “up to two times faster” than the last generation, and thanks to iFixit, we now know why. The bigger model packs a brand new 128GB M.2 x 4 SSD from frenemy Samsung — which owns the PCIe SSD market at the moment — giving it a stellar max read speed of 1,285MB/s. That’s twice as fast as the SanDisk-equipped 11-inch MacBook Air, which still cooks along at a mere 668MB/s. The good news is that the SSDs are one of the few replaceable parts, and you could actually swap in the faster part on the smaller Air. That’s assuming you’re feeling brave — the MacBook air only rates 4 out of 10 on iFixit’s repairability scale. [Image credit: iFixit] Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Source: Engadget - Read the full article...

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Review: XPS 12’s Haswell upgrade improves an already-good convertible PC
Oct06

Review: XPS 12’s Haswell upgrade improves an already-good convertible PC

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. That first wave of Windows 8 convertible laptops wasn’t always great. Awkward “slider” designs that compromised the keyboard and trackpad were all-too-common, and not many of them could manage much more than five or six hours on a single charge. That’s not terrible, but by the time you’re spending $1000 or more on a laptop you should be entitled to something a little better than “not terrible.” Dell’s XPS 12 didn’t have the first problem—its unique flippable screen didn’t get in the way of its keyboard or trackpad, and while it was a little chunky it still managed to be one of our favorite Windows 8 convertibles. Almost a year later, we have the XPS 12’s successor in our hands, and it doesn’t fix what isn’t broken. Dell hasn’t changed the design since last year, but it has knocked $200 off the entry-level asking price and added new Haswell CPUs from Intel. If the XPS 12 is anything like the 2013 MacBook Air or the new Acer Aspire S7, these will help solve the battery life problem. It should make the XPS 12 even more appealing if you’re looking to buy a new system to run the upcoming Windows 8.1. We called last year’s XPS 12 the Windows 8 convertible laptop to beat. While other good convertibles (and even some promising-looking Haswell tablets) have shown up on the scene since then, the Haswell version is still very good. Like most convertibles with non-removable keyboards, it remains a sub-optimal dedicated tablet at best. But aside from some thick bezels, the convertible mechanism doesn’t keep the XPS 12 from being a good, well-built laptop that just happens to turn into a husky tablet. That said, the new XPS 12 isn’t a huge upgrade from last year. If you’ve been waiting on a Haswell version of the laptop to boost battery life, this revised version is the answer to those prayers. If the older XPS 12 wasn’t your cup of tea for other reasons, go ahead and move on—this is just a slightly updated version of the same laptop. Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Read the full article...

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Dell brings big battery life to new $379 Inspiron 11 notebook
Sep17

Dell brings big battery life to new $379 Inspiron 11 notebook

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.With Intel’s new Haswell chip, manufacturers can choose to either build slimmer notebooks or try to optimize battery life as much as possible. Dell has clearly shown its dedication to the latter with the new Inspiron 11 3000 series. Budget notebooks don’t always have big batteries, but Dell claims the $379 Haswell version of the Inspiron 11 lasts up to eight hours and 20 minutes on a single charge. Besides battery life, the Inspiron 11 is a fairly straightforward budget notebook. It’s highly portable at 3.15 pounds and 0.83 inches thick, and has what Dell calls “soft touch paint” that gives the notebook a pleasant, almost rubbery feel. And while the 11.6-inch display isn’t the brightest and sharpest on the market, it’s touch-enabled even at the starting price. What’s even more interesting is what Dell is leaving off its new notebooks. The company stressed a new focus on “what it’s like to live with a PC” in everyday life. This will translate to a significant decrease in both bloatware and superfluous popups, like the persistent McAfee antivirus notifications. We’re not sure which apps have made the cut and will remain preinstalled on the new Inspiron, but it’s definitely a step in the right direction. Dell says the Inspiron 11 3000 series will be available on October 3rd. Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Read the full article...

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Alienware 14 and 17 review: Dell's new gaming laptops are fast, powerful and well-lit
Sep15

Alienware 14 and 17 review: Dell's new gaming laptops are fast, powerful and well-lit

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Picking a gaming laptop is a difficult task these days: machines can be found in all shapes and sizes, from pricey thin-and-lights to oversized behemoths. That wide selection is a good thing, allowing buyers to pick and choose the best machine from dozens of manufacturers, possibly even finding a deal on a lower-cost ODM system. Still, there needs to be some sort of benchmark buyers can look to, and for many, Alienware serves that purpose. The brand, now owned by Dell, is known for offering powerful, high-quality machines at the market’s going rate; that is, not too cheap, not too expensive, but reasonably priced with just a hint of prestige. Considering Alienware’s 2013 hardware refresh, it seemed about time we took a closer look at Dell’s updated family of gaming portables. We picked out two: the Alienware 14 ($1,199+) and the larger Alienware 17 ($1,499+). Let’s see how they stack up. Filed under: Gaming, Laptops, Dell Comments Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Read the full article...

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Typing stealth: a review of the CODE Keyboard
Sep15

Typing stealth: a review of the CODE Keyboard

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. The Code Keyboard, designed by Jeff Atwood of Coding Horror. Two and a half years ago, I fell in love with a mechanical keyboard. It was comfortable to use but profoundly loud, to the point of being obnoxious. It was audible across rooms and through walls and into the night—not to me, with my headphones on, but to most living, breathing souls within a 50-yard radius. Jeff Atwood of Coding Horror appears to know the dilemma of perpetual typists like myself. We love our mechanical keyboards with Cherry MX switches, but they sound off like so many M16 rifles. One of the leading features of his new CODE keyboard is that it is “quiet,” but it packs a handful of other quirks meant to streamline usage for heavy duty users. The sound of Not Even Close To Silence (video link) The keyboard is a pretty spare design, with translucent legends on the keys that allow individual-key backlights to shine through. The body is weighted to keep it from shifting around on your desk, and this one is hefty enough to stay put through minor earthquakes: the 87/88-key version is two pounds and the 104/105-key Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Read the full article...

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‘Insidious: Chapter 2’ review: the horror of diminishing returns
Sep13

‘Insidious: Chapter 2’ review: the horror of diminishing returns

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Director James Wan has proven himself to be one of our most gifted genre filmmakers. After kicking off the Saw franchise almost a decade ago, he surprised everyone in 2010 with Insidious, a suspenseful take on the classic ghost story. Wan took things up a notch earlier this year with the fantastic The Conjuring, showing that he’s not just a master of the simple scare, but that he can summon the kind of unrelenting dread that’s a signature of horror classics. His second film this year is Insidious: Chapter 2, and while it bears all the trademark flourishes that have made his recent outings so effective, it’s missing their soul, resulting in a rushed, jump-scare amusement that shocks and then immediately fades away. Continue reading… Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Read the full article...

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Motorola Droid Mini review: searching for a tiny flagship smartphone
Sep13

Motorola Droid Mini review: searching for a tiny flagship smartphone

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. “Check out this screen, this thing is huge.” It all started in 2011. Poor souls waiting in long Apple Store lines craned their necks to catch a glimpse of a big new phone that no one yet recognized. It was the Samsung Galaxy S II, with a bright and colorful 4.3-inch display that dwarfed the newly released iPhone 4S. Samsung’s message was simple: the next big thing is already here. And it kept on growing. By the time Apple released the 4-inch iPhone 5, Android phones had effectively lapped it in the screen-size department. The popular Android phones, like the Galaxy S III, HTC One X, and Motorola Droid RAZR HD, were now closer to 5 inches. Samsung pushed things even further with the massively popular Galaxy Note lineup —… Continue reading… Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Read the full article...

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A tale of two iPhones: Hands-on with the iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C (update: video!)
Sep11

A tale of two iPhones: Hands-on with the iPhone 5S and iPhone 5C (update: video!)

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Apple’s two new iPhones in all their multicolored glory. Andrew Cunningham Apple took to the stage of its town hall in Cupertino today to unveil not one but two new iPhones for the fall, the multi-colored iPhone 5C and the new flagship iPhone 5S. We’ll be giving both phones the review treatment when they’re out, but in the meantime Apple let us spend a little hands-on time with them (and some of their new features) ahead of their launch. The iPhone 5S: A design refined Hands-on with the iPhone 5C and iPhone 5S (video link) If you’ve already held an iPhone 5, you know exactly what it’s like to hold an iPhone 5S. The size, weight, and build quality all feel exactly the same as last year’s flagship. Observations that the iPhone 5 felt “almost too thin” have faded with familiarity, but if you’re carrying the old glass-backed iPhone 4 or iPhone 4S, the feel of the iPhone 5S is still surprising. Every measurement, right down to the 3.95 ounce weight and 0.30-inch thickness, is identical to the iPhone 5. A pair of visual cues will help you distinguish the 5S from the older iPhone Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Read the full article...

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Dell XPS 12 review (2013)
Sep09

Dell XPS 12 review (2013)

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter. Last fall marked a renaissance in laptop design. With Windows 8 on the horizon, manufacturers built truly exciting notebooks with high-res touch screens, clever back-flipping hinges, superb construction, and even displays on both sides. With touch screens as a focal point, it seemed that laptop manufacturers were finally ready to compete with Apple and offer premium laptops that were actually worth buying. When those laptops actually arrived, though, they weren’t the winners we’d hoped. The primary culprit was battery life: gorgeous laptops like the Acer Aspire S7 couldn’t last more than a few lousy hours on a charge. Now, with new battery-sipping Intel processors inside, those Windows machines are finally coming into their own. T… Continue reading… Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Read the full article...

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LG G2 review
Sep09

LG G2 review

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.There are a lot of smartphones out there now. You know this. To add to the confusion, many companies are now parading out multiple top-drawer phones: think Samsung’s Galaxy S and Note series, or the Xperia Z and Z Ultra from Sony. Even LG, whose new G2 flagship I’m poring over this time around, has both the G and G Pro to tempt buyers. It’s getting increasingly difficult to launch a smartphone with some standout feature, something more than just bigger screens and faster processors. For the G2, LG’s decided to make a major change to the phone’s physical layout — in a bullet-point summary, it has buttons on the back. Three, in fact. LG reckons that as the size of smartphones has increased, at this point, the viability of buttons around the edges is now questionable. The new G model lands between last year’s Optimus G and the Pro size-wise, breaking through the 5-inch screen barrier with a bright 5.2-inch, 1080p IPS screen. The rest of the feature set will seem familiar to anyone who’s read a flagship Android phone review in the last 12 months. Optical image stabilization, remote control blaster, a mixed bag of proprietary software features and Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Read the full article...

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Nokia Lumia 625 review
Sep09

Nokia Lumia 625 review

Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Another week, another Lumia. This latest grenade thrown by Nokia in its continued assault on the smartphone market is the Lumia 625. Following up on its previous high-end devices — the good-looking one, the one with the fancy camera — the 625 is a soldier of lower rank. There’s already an army of budget Windows Phones that fill various niches, so what’s the deal? Well, despite the number on its dog tag, the 625 is far from a Lumia 620 variant: it’s a completely different phone. For starters, it sports the biggest screen of any Lumia to date (for now, anyway). Actually, make that any Nokia phone ever made. But the real reason it exists has nothing to do with the display size; it’s all about the 4G radio hiding away inside. Does LTE, plus a big screen and eyebrow-raising price tag, make it worth your while, though?%Gallery-slideshow79311% Filed under: Cellphones, Mobile, Microsoft, Nokia Comments Share on Facebook.Share on Twitter.Share on Google+Share on StumbleUponShare on Twitter.Follow @DailyTechWhip Read the full article...

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