Top tech stories of the day for Thursday 14 November 2013


Judge rules against authors in Google Books copyright infringement case – Google’s Books project, which has indexed millions of titles and made them available online, hasn’t always been on completely solid legal footing. After all, Books operates without the permission of authors, which has understandably drawn some ire from copyright holders, not to mention other web giants. Well, a federal ruling handed down today gives strong backing to Google’s digitizing efforts: U.S. Circuit Judge Denny Chin dismissed a copyright infringement lawsuit brought by an author group against Google.

Judge rules against authors in Google Books copyright infringement case

 


Coin stores multiple credit card info, aims to slim your wallet down (video) – What you see in the picture above promises to be the one credit card to rule them all. It’s called Coin, and while it looks like any other traditional plastic, it’s actually an electronic device that stores all your CC info in one package. Since Coin relies on data stored on its companion app, you’ll need to scan your cards using the accompanying phone/tablet dongle and then take their pictures. When we asked its creators what prevents people from scanning someone else’s plastics, a spokesperson told us the system only accepts those with the user’s personal information. Now here’s what’s nifty: unlike NFC tech that requires special hardware, Coin will work with any credit card swiper. Also, it sends an alert to your phone if you stroll away with your frappuccino having left it on the counter.

Coin stores multiple credit card info, aims to slim your wallet down (video)

 

ASUS plans new smartphone and Chromebook launches for early 2014 – ASUS’ bread and butter is in the PC business, so as growth dwindles, it’s got to reinvent itself elsewhere. According to the Taipei Times, the company is set to introduce its first line of Chromebooks and a number of new smartphones early next year. We’ll likely see new handsets at CES 2014 in January, possibly including the 5-inch MeMOFone, followed by new 11.6-inch and 13.3-inch Chrome OS-powered notebooks (said to be priced at $199 and $249 respectively) later in the quarter. ASUS previously teased Haswell Chromebooks at Intel’s Developer Forum in September, where it also showed off its new lightweight Chromebox PC. Further down the line, ASUS will become the latest entrant into the wearable market — we’ll apparently get to see what it’s been working on at Computex in June.

ASUS plans new smartphone and Chromebook launches for early 2014

 

iWork for iCloud update brings those collaborative tools we’ve been waiting for – We’re not going so far as to call it a Google Docs killer, but those iWork updates announced back at the iPad event the other month certainly make Apple’s productivity tools a fair bit more appealing (particularly when coupled with those returning features, naturally). Those who’ve tooled around with the iCloud interface have likely noticed a few of the highlighted upgrades have thus far been missing from the proceedings – namely a number of collaborative tools.

iWork for iCloud update brings those collaborative tools we’ve been waiting for

 

Microsoft’s new Cybercrime Center battles malware in CSI-style – Microsoft is unveiling a new Cybercrime Center that’s designed to battle malware, botnets, and other internet crime. The new futuristic facility has been built at the company’s Redmond headquarters as an area to combine Microsoft’s researchers, security experts, and lawyers into a central location. Microsoft has been tackling cybercrime for years, including efforts to take down various botnets, but the new secured facility takes things a step further.

Microsoft is using its own technologies, including the PhotoDNA anti-child-pornography technology adopted by Twitter and Facebook, to tackle growing problems with cybercrime. While the facility will house separate labs for Microsoft employees to work in, it also includes a secure and separate location for third-party partners. Cybersecurity experts are free to use the facility “for an indefinite period of time,” to work with Microsoft on any investigations.

Microsoft’s new Cybercrime Center battles malware in CSI-style

 

Power play: how Tesla’s unprecedented battery demand could energize US manufacturing – If you build it, they won’t necessarily come.

In 2009, the Obama administration invested $1.2 billion into US-based factories creating batteries for electric vehicles. The result was a disaster. One by one, every company that received federal funding went belly-up or admitted the money hadn’t had a real impact. For instance, LG-owned Compact Power quietly revealed that it hadn’t produced a single battery in over two years of operation, while A123 Systems’ higher-profile bankruptcy was viewed as the second coming of failed solar panel-maker Solyndra. Even with hundreds of millions of dollars of federal funding, key electric vehicle contracts went to Japanese and Korean factories instead of their American equivalents.

Power play: how Tesla’s unprecedented battery demand could energize US manufacturing

Under Armour goes after activity tracking in a big way with acquisition of MapMyFitness – Under Armour is making a major play to gain a foothold in the fitness-tracking market, which is led by the likes of Nike, Fitbit, and Jawbone. The company has snapped up MapMyFitness for $150 million, giving it instant entry into the blooming activity-tracking business. MapMyFitness isn’t known for specific devices; rather, it offers a way to analyze, use, and share the data provided by hundreds of other devices. Since its launch in 2007, the company has signed up 20 million users, of which 9 million use the service at least once per month, according to The Wall Street Journal. One of the more appealing features of MapMyFitness — which is spl

Under Armour goes after activity tracking in a big way with acquisition of MapMyFitness

 

Healthcare.gov if I had known it wasn’t going to work – President Barack Obama says he had no idea how bad the problems were with the online insurance marketplace Healthcare.gov even a week after launch. If he had known, he would not have allowed it to open on October 1st, he said during a press conference today.

“I was not informed directly that the website would not be working the way it was supposed to. Had I been informed, I wouldn’t be going out saying, ‘boy, this is going to be great,'” the President told reporters during a White House press briefing. “I’m accused of a lot of things, but I don’t think I’m stupid enough to go around saying ‘this is going to be like shopping on Amazon or Travelocity’ a week before the website opened if I thought it wasn’t going to work.

Healthcare.gov if I had known it wasn’t going to work

 

Isis nationwide rollout of its mobile wallet is now available for all

Isis nationwide rollout is now available for AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon customers – After announcing plans for nationwide deployment back in July, and nabbing commitments from both Chase and American Express in the process, Isis is now available for the masses.

Customers on AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon who wield one of over 40 capable handsets can snag a free enhanced SIM and download the app via Google Play to begin using the mobile wallet in all of its NFC payment glory.

Isis nationwide rollout is now available for AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon customers

 

 

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Tom Peters.



Author: Tom Peters

Journalist. Digital enthusiast. Asking questions about media business models and writing for DailyTechWhip.com

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