Top tech stories of the day for Wednesday 18 Dec, 2013

Apple’s new Mac Pro will finally go on sale December 19th – We knew it was coming, now it’s almost here. Apple has confirmed that its new Mac Pro will go on sale from tomorrow, starting at $3,000. For that, you’ll get a 3.7GHz quad-core Xeon CPU (“with Turbo Boost speeds up to 3.9 GHz”), 12GB DRAM, two AMD FirePro D300 GPUs, and a 256GB SSD. As usual, you’ll be able to order online through Apple’s online store, as well as in retail stores, meaning you could take one home before the Christmas holidays officially begin.

Apple’s new Mac Pro will finally go on sale December 19th

 

 

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Translate.com releases mobile apps that can translate 75 languages on-the-go – Translate.com’s new mobile apps can tell you. The company released iOS and Android apps today, which can translate text, voice, and images of text between 75 different languages.

“Our goal is to be everyone’s private translator and facilitate conversations that could not happen before,” said founder and CEO Anthos Chrysanthou. “We’re a bit like the ‘Waze’ of translation — users can tap into the community when it will make a big difference, but they can still get from A to B on their own.”

Translate.com releases mobile apps that can translate 75 languages on-the-go

 

 

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Monitors are so 2013: Apple patents a ‘desk-free’ computer with smart laser projector – 
Imagine a Mac Mini that’s completely wireless and can intelligently project a large image on a wall, instead of relying on an external monitor. It may sound like science fiction, but it actually may not be that far off.

Apple today has received U.S. Patent No. 8,610,726, “Computer systems and methods with projected display,” reports Apple Insider. It offers a glimpse at a new face of computing that isn’t shackled down by traditional monitors, and which could potentially do for in-home projectors what the iPhone did for smartphones.

Monitors are so 2013: Apple patents a ‘desk-free’ computer with smart laser projector

 

 


Opera Max beta compresses most of the data going through your Android device – Opera’s mobile browsers are quite popular because of their ability to compress data, but it’s unfortunately been limited to just that — the browser itself. This becomes less and less useful as smartphones continue to evolve, since our data usage patterns encompass so much more than just the simple browser: many of us are constantly streaming music, uploading and downloading images and apps, and so on.

Opera Max beta compresses most of the data going through your Android device

 

 

Fully wearable Iron Man Mark III suit is made to 3D printed order for $35,000 – We joked yesterday about finding the perfect gift for that eccentric billionaire (or millionaire, or really just any “rich” person) in your life, but nothing truly says money to burn like your very own Iron Man suit. The real kicker here is that this Iron Man Mark III suit, made by (wait for it) Iron Man Factory, is actually fully wearable and made to fit anyone as tall as 5′ 5″ to 6’1″. It also incorporates sensor-controlled motors — powered by a AAA battery — to activate the “thrusters” on back and even slide open the helmet so your loved ones can smack that smug Tony Stark-like perma-grin off your face.

Fully wearable Iron Man Mark III suit is made to 3D printed order for $35,000

 

 

Avegant Glyph: the virtual reality headset made for the mainstream –Picture it: you’re sitting on the plane or in the doctor’s waiting room, listening to music on a large, good-looking set of headphones. You decide you’d rather catch up on Justified, or play a little Call of Duty. You tip your headphones forward until the broad white band is now in front of your face, and suddenly your show or game appears on the underside. It’s like watching an 80-inch TV, except the picture you’re seeing isn’t on an LCD screen — it’s being projected directly into your eyes.

Avegant Glyph: the virtual reality headset made for the mainstream

 

 

No More Woof

Yes, this is dog: No More Woof aims to translate canine thoughts into human speech – Head over to Indiegogo today and you’ll find a particularly wacky (and risky) project bidding for your investment. It’s a device that goes by the name of No More Woof, which admittedly sounds like it does horrible things to dogs’ vocal cords, but which actually promises something very different. It’s a canine-sized headset that consists of EEG recorders connected to a small Raspberry Pi computer and a loudspeaker, supposedly allowing “ionic current flows” in a dog’s brain to be translated into human speech. A $65 model is said to distinguish between three different thoughts, including tiredness and curiosity, while more expensive options will have more sensors and more powerful software.

Yes, this is dog: No More Woof aims to translate canine thoughts into human speech

 

 

Smithsonian calls video games art, adds two to permanent collection – While society at large questions whether video games can be art, to the world’s largest museum, the question has already been answered. The Smithsonian American Art Museum announced yesterday that it has added two video games to its permanent collection: thatgamecompany’s hypnotic Flower, and Halo 2600, a side-scrolling de-make of Xbox shooter Halo. Both games can be seen in the Smithsonian’s The Art of Video Games exhibition, currently on tour in the United States. In a statement, the museum called Flower — in which players control the wind — “an entirely new kind of physical and virtual choreography.”

Smithsonian calls video games art, adds two to permanent collection

 

 

‘Pulp Fiction’ and 24 other classics added to US film archive – The US Library of Congress has today revealed its 2013 selection of 25 movies it will be adding to the country’s National Film Archive in recognition of their “great cultural, historic or aesthetic significance.” The highlight of that bunch is Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction, an expletive- and violence-laden tale of interconnecting storylines and dark humor that never aspired to be as great as it turned out to be. The director’s initial intent was to create a pastiche of film noir and the comic books he grew up reading, but in the process of remixing the old he came up with a resoundingly fresh and visceral experience.

‘Pulp Fiction’ and 24 other classics added to US film archive

 

 

Walt Mossberg’s final Wall Street Journal column looks back on two decades of tech – After 22 years of insightful and important commentary on consumer technology, Walt Mossberg has written his final column for The Wall Street Journal and its All Things Dtech blog. In it, Mossberg picks out the twelve most influential products from his time as the newspaper’s tech reviewer, identifying each one as something that changed the course of digital history. Included among his dozen are Windows 95, the Palm Pilot, Google’s search engine, and the iPhone.

Walt Mossberg’s final Wall Street Journal column looks back on two decades of tech

 

 

 

Thanks for reading,
Andrew Richardson

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Author: Andrew Richardson

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